The 2022 Ohio gubernatorial election will take place on November 8, 2022, to elect the governor of Ohio. Incumbent Republican Governor Mike DeWine is running for re-election to a second term in office. The winner of the 2022 gubernatorial election is scheduled to be sworn in on January 9, 2023. Ohio’s primary elections were held on May 3.

Democrat Nan Whaley is challenging incumbent Republican Mike DeWine. A major issue in the election is the Ohio nuclear bribery scandal, in which electric utility FirstEnergy paid millions of dollars in bribes to Republican legislators to develop legislation favorable to them, which was signed by DeWine.[1]

Since 1958, when Ohio governors began serving four-year terms, every Republican incumbent has won a second term by a double digit margin.

Republican primary

Former U.S. Representative Jim Renacci challenged DeWine in the primary

Incumbent Governor Mike DeWine faced backlash from Republicans due to having implemented strict COVID-19 restrictions, such as a statewide stay at home order and mask mandates.[2][3][4] Due to this, on April 30th, 2021, farmer Joe Blystone became the first candidate to announce a primary challenge to DeWine. On June 9th, former U.S. Representative Jim Renacci also announced a run, later being followed up by former state representative Ron Hood.[5][6][7] As a result, DeWine became the first incumbent Ohio governor to face a primary challenger since Jim Rhodes in 1978 and the first to have multiple challengers since Michael Disalle in 1962. Initial polling showed Renacci in the lead; however his lead soon evaporated, as DeWine attempted to appeal to conservatives angry with his COVID response by attacking President Joe Biden’s policies and signing Constitutional carry into law, allowing permitless carry of firearms.[8][9][10] Incumbent governors rarely ever lose their primaries. Ultimately, DeWine prevailed in the May 3rd primary election, however only won with a plurality of the vote, which suggests that he could have lost had his opponents not split the vote.[11]

Candidates

Nominated

Eliminated in primary

Declined

Endorsements

Mike DeWine
Local officials
Individuals
Labor unions
Organizations
Jim Renacci
State representatives
  • John Becker, former state representative from the 65th district (2013–2020)[39]
  • Jennifer Gross, state representative from the 52nd district (2021–present)[39]
  • Ron Maag, former state representative from the 62nd district (2013–2016) and the 35th district (2009–2013)[39]
  • Seth Morgan former state representative from the 36th district (2009–2011)[40]
  • Nino Vitale, state representative from the 85th district (2015–present)[40]
  • Scott Wiggam, state representative from the 1st district (2017–present)[39]
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Declined to endorse
Organizations

Polling

Graphical summary
Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
Joe
Blystone
Mike
DeWine
Jim
Renacci
Other
[a]
Margin
Real Clear PoliticsFebruary 25 – May 1, 2022May 2, 202216.5%48.0%31.0%4.5%DeWine +17.0
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
Joe
Blystone
Mike
DeWine
Ron
Hood
Jim
Renacci
OtherUndecided
The Trafalgar Group (R)April 29 – May 1, 20221,081 (LV)± 3.0%19%47%2%27%5%
Emerson CollegeApril 28–29, 2022885 (LV)± 3.2%12%45%2%30%12%
Fox NewsApril 20–24, 2022906 (LV)± 3.0%19%43%24%1%12%
The Trafalgar Group (R)April 13–14, 20221,078 (LV)± 3.0%24%40%2%26%10%
University of AkronFebruary 17 – March 15, 2022– (LV)51%23%10%17%
Fox NewsMarch 2–6, 2022918 (LV)± 3.0%21%50%18%<1%10%
Emerson CollegeFebruary 25–26, 2022410 (LV)± 4.8%20%34%0%9%36%
The Trafalgar Group (R)February 1–4, 20221,066 (LV)± 3.0%20%41%23%16%
Public Policy Polling (D)[A]January 25–26, 2022626 (LV)± 3.9%38%33%29%
Fabrizio Lee (R)[B]January 11–13, 2022800 (LV)± 3.5%38%46%16%
Fabrizio Lee (R)[B]May 2021600 (LV)± 4.0%34%42%24%

Results

Results by county:

  DeWine
  •   30–40%
  •   40–50%
  •   50–60%
  •   60–70%
  Renacci
  •   30–40%
  •   40–50%
  Blystone
  •   30–40%
  •   40–50%
  •   50–60%
Republican primary results[48]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican

519,594 48.1%
Republican
302,49428.0%
Republican
  • Joe Blystone
  • Jeremiah Workman
235,58421.8%
Republican22,4112.1%
Total votes1,080,083 100.0%

Democratic primary

Former Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley finished second in the primary

Candidates

Nominated

Eliminated in primary

Withdrawn

Declined

Endorsements

John Cranley
State senators
State representatives
Individuals
Newspapers
Nan Whaley
U.S. Senators
State senators
State representatives
Local officials
Individuals
  • Joe Rugola, Executive Director of the Ohio Association of Public School Employees (OAPSE)[63]
Unions
Organizations
Declined to endorse

Polling

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
John
Cranley
Nan
Whaley
OtherUndecided
University of AkronFebruary 17 – March 15, 2022– (LV)18%23%6%54%
Emerson CollegeFebruary 25–26, 2022313 (LV)± 5.5%16%16%69%
Clarity Campaign Labs (D)[C]January 17–19, 2022670 (LV)± 3.8%20%33%48%

Results

Results by county:

  Whaley
  •   50–60%
  •   60–70%
  •   70–80%
  •   80–90%
  Cranley
  •   50–60%
  •   60–70%
Democratic primary results[48]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic

331,014 65.0%
Democratic178,13235.0%
Total votes509,146 100.0%

Independents

Candidates

Running

Tim Grady,[69][70][71] Apatheist and perennial candidate from Mansfield, Ohio.

Disqualified

General election

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report[73]Likely RJuly 26, 2022
Inside Elections[74]Solid RJuly 22, 2022
Sabato’s Crystal Ball[75]Safe RJune 2, 2022
Politico[76]Likely RApril 1, 2022
RCP[77]Likely RJanuary 10, 2022
Fox News[78]Likely RMay 12, 2022
538[79]Solid RJuly 31, 2022

Endorsements

Mike DeWine (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
Local officials
Individuals
Labor unions
Organizations
Nan Whaley (D)
U.S. Senators
State senators
State representatives
Local officials
Individuals
  • Joe Rugola, Executive Director of the Ohio Association of Public School Employees (OAPSE)[63]
Unions
Organizations

Polling

Aggregate polls
Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
Mike
DeWine (R)
Nan
Whaley (D)
Undecided
[c]
Margin
Real Clear PoliticsMay 22 – August 19, 2022August 22, 202249.3%33.7%17.0%DeWine +15.6
Graphical summary
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
Mike
DeWine (R)
Nan
Whaley (D)
OtherUndecided
The Trafalgar Group (R)August 16–19, 20221,087 (LV)± 2.9%54%38%8%
Emerson CollegeAugust 15–16, 2022925 (LV)± 3.2%49%33%8%11%
Lake Research Partners (D)[D]August 4–9, 2022600 (LV)± 4.0%44%43%8%5%
Lake Research Partners (D)[D]August 3–9, 2022600 (LV)± 4.0%44%43%7%6%
Suffolk UniversityMay 22–24, 2022500 (LV)± 4.4%45%30%11%[d]13%
Redfield & Wilton StrategiesAugust 20–24, 20211,200 (RV)± 2.8%44%25%10%16%
1,160 (LV)± 2.9%46%27%11%16%
Hypothetical polling
Mike DeWine vs. John Cranley
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
Mike
DeWine (R)
John
Cranley (D)
OtherUndecided
Redfield & Wilton StrategiesAugust 20–24, 20211,200 (RV)± 2.8%44%24%10%16%
1,160 (LV)± 2.9%47%25%11%15%

Results

2022 Ohio gubernatorial election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican
Democratic
Total votes

Notes

  1. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  2. ^ a b c d Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  3. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  4. ^ Petersen with 11%, “someone else” with 1%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ This poll was sponsored by the Democratic Governors Association
  2. ^ a b This poll was sponsored by Renacci’s campaign committee
  3. ^ This poll was sponsored by Whaley’s campaign
  4. ^ a b This poll was circulated by the Ohio Democratic Party

References

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External links

Official campaign websites