Steve ChabotSteve Chabot

Current Position: US Representative for OH 1st District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1995 – 2009

Featured Quote: 
“Today, it’s more important than ever that we protect innocent unborn life.” Watch my remarks on the House Floor about making the Hyde Amendment permanent. #HydeSavesLives

Featured Video: 
Chabot Q&A on U.S. cooperation with Europe on China & the broader Indo-Pacific

i
NPR’s Audie Cornish talks with Congressman Steve Chabot, a ranking member of the foreign affairs subcommittee overseeing Afghanistan, about Thursday’s bombings and President Biden’s speech.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

President Biden spoke late this afternoon on the events in Afghanistan today. He called the fallen U.S. service people part of a great, noble company of heroes. He pledged the U.S. evacuation would continue, and he vowed to hunt down the group responsible for the suicide attacks. For more reaction, let’s bring in Congressman Steve Chabot. He’s a Republican from Ohio. He’s also a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. That’s a ranking member of the subcommittee overseeing Afghanistan as well.

Welcome to the program.

STEVE CHABOT: Thank you. Good evening.

CORNISH: Recently, when you spoke with NPR, you called on President Biden to take responsibility for how events have been unfolding with this withdrawal process. Did you hear him do that in his address this afternoon?

CHABOT: No. Once again, he’s basically putting the blame elsewhere. And I think the important thing to remember that in the last year and a half, we had not suffered one military – an American casualty. And today, in this chaotic debacle of a pullout, we suffered at least 13, in addition to that, obviously, the dozens and dozens of Afghans, mostly our allies, who were killed as well. So this was a tragic…

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OH 1st District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1995 – 2009

Featured Quote: 
“Today, it’s more important than ever that we protect innocent unborn life.” Watch my remarks on the House Floor about making the Hyde Amendment permanent. #HydeSavesLives

Featured Video: 
Chabot Q&A on U.S. cooperation with Europe on China & the broader Indo-Pacific

News

i
NPR’s Audie Cornish talks with Congressman Steve Chabot, a ranking member of the foreign affairs subcommittee overseeing Afghanistan, about Thursday’s bombings and President Biden’s speech.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

President Biden spoke late this afternoon on the events in Afghanistan today. He called the fallen U.S. service people part of a great, noble company of heroes. He pledged the U.S. evacuation would continue, and he vowed to hunt down the group responsible for the suicide attacks. For more reaction, let’s bring in Congressman Steve Chabot. He’s a Republican from Ohio. He’s also a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. That’s a ranking member of the subcommittee overseeing Afghanistan as well.

Welcome to the program.

STEVE CHABOT: Thank you. Good evening.

CORNISH: Recently, when you spoke with NPR, you called on President Biden to take responsibility for how events have been unfolding with this withdrawal process. Did you hear him do that in his address this afternoon?

CHABOT: No. Once again, he’s basically putting the blame elsewhere. And I think the important thing to remember that in the last year and a half, we had not suffered one military – an American casualty. And today, in this chaotic debacle of a pullout, we suffered at least 13, in addition to that, obviously, the dozens and dozens of Afghans, mostly our allies, who were killed as well. So this was a tragic…

Twitter

About

Steve Chabot 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Steve Chabot has proudly served Ohio’s First Congressional District for 24 years. A lifelong Cincinnatian, Steve previously served as a Cincinnati City Councilman and Hamilton County Commissioner for five years each prior to being elected to Congress in 1994.

Since becoming a Member of Congress, Congressman Chabot has served on the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Small Business and the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

Congressman Chabot currently serves as the Ranking Member of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia and Nonproliferation. He has also served as: Chairman of the House Committee on Small Business from 2015-2018;  Chairman of the Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution from 2001-2006; Ranking Member on the Small Business Committee from 2019-2020 and 2007-2008; Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia from 2011-2012; and Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific from 2013-2014.

Steve continues to fight wasteful government spending in Congress, where he is one of the leading advocates for fiscal responsibility. He has consistently voted to eliminate wasteful spending and reduce the excessive tax burden on hard-working Americans. Nonpartisan taxpayer advocacy groups such as Citizens Against Government Waste, the Concord Coalition and the National Taxpayers Union have time and again rated him as one of the most taxpayer friendly members of Congress.

While in Congress, Steve has also helped lead efforts to reduce the regulatory burden on America’s small businesses, and to combat the opioid epidemic. He is an outspoken defender of the rights of the unborn, most importantly having authored the ban on the practice of partial-birth abortions.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, as Ranking Member of the House Small Business Committee, Steve worked closely with Democratic Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez and their colleagues in the Senate to help craft, enact, implement and improve the Paycheck Protection Program.  This critical program provided forgivable loans to small businesses struggling to survive the economic shutdowns implemented by states across the country, provided that the businesses kept their employees on payroll.  Ultimately, the program helped to save over 50 million jobs nationwide, including more than 256,000 in the First Congressional District.

In January 1999, Congressman Chabot served as one of 13 House Managers during the Senate impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton, where he received praise for his even-handed and thoughtful approach to the trial.

Steve graduated from LaSalle High School in 1971, and earned his undergraduate degree from the College of William and Mary four years later. After college, he returned to Cincinnati to teach at St. Joseph’s School in the West End, while studying at Northern Kentucky University’s Salmon P. Chase College of Law in the evening.

Steve and his wife, Donna, live in the Cincinnati neighborhood of Westwood. They have two children, Erica and Randy, and are the proud grandparents of Reed and Keira Noelle.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Congressional Taiwan Caucus (co-chair)
  • U.S.-Japan Caucus
  • House Baltic Caucus
  • House Cambodia Caucus
  • Republican Study Committee

Experience

Work Experience

  • Served as a U.S. Representative from Ohio
    1995 to 2009
  • Commisioner
    Hamilton County, Ohio
    1990 to 1994

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1953
Place of Birth: Cincinnati, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Roman Catholic
Spouse: Donna Chabot
Children: Erica Chabot, Randy Chabot

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2408 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2216
Fax: (202) 225-3012

Warren County Office
11 South Broadway
Lebanon, OH 45036
Phone: (513) 421-8704
Fax: (513) 421-8722

Cincinnati Office
441 Vine Street, Rm. 3003
Cincinnati, OH 45202
Phone: (513) 684-2723
Fax: (513) 421-8722

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Steven Joseph Chabot (/ˈʃæbət/ SHAB-ət; born January 22, 1953) is an American politician and lawyer who has been the United States Representative for Ohio’s 1st congressional district since 2011. A member of the Republican Party, he previously represented the district from 1995 to 2009.

Early life, education, and pre-political career

Chabot was born in 1953 in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Gerard Joseph and Doris Leona (née Tilley) Chabot; paternally, he is of French-Canadian descent.[1] He graduated from La Salle High School in Cincinnati in 1971, and then from the College of William and Mary in 1975, earning a Bachelor of Arts in physical education. He went on to obtain a Juris Doctor degree from Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law in 1978. He worked as an elementary school teacher in 1975–76 while taking law classes at night. Chabot also taught political science at the University of Cincinnati and chaired the Boy Scouts of Cincinnati.[2]

As a practicing attorney from 1978 to 1994, Chabot handled domestic disputes and the drafting of wills as a sole practitioner.[3] He operated out of a small law office in Westwood.[4]

Early political career

Chabot ran unsuccessfully for the Cincinnati City Council as an independent candidate in 1979 and as a Republican in 1983. He won a seat in 1985 as a Republican and was reelected for the next four years. In 1988, he ran for the U.S. House of Representatives against seven-term incumbent Democrat Tom Luken, who defeated him, 56–44%.[5] In 1990 he was appointed a Commissioner of Hamilton County, Ohio, and was elected later that year and again in 1992, holding that office until 1994.

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

In 1994, Chabot ran for the U.S. House again and defeated Democratic incumbent David S. Mann of Ohio’s 1st congressional district, 56%–44%. In 1996, he defeated Democrat Mark Longabaugh, a member of the Cincinnati City Council, 54%–43%.[6] In 1998, he defeated Cincinnati Mayor Roxanne Qualls, 53% to 47%.[7] In the series of debates during that campaign, Qualls criticized Chabot for not funneling enough federal spending to his home district. Chabot countered that he would not support “wasteful or unnecessary” federal programs.[8][9] In 2000, he defeated City Councilman John Cranley 53–44%.[10] In 2002, he defeated Greg Harris with 65% of the vote.[10] In 2004, he defeated Harris again, with 60% of the vote.[11]

2006

109th Congress portrait

Chabot defeated Democratic challenger John Cranley again, this time by a narrower margin of 52–48%.[12]

2008

Chabot lost to State Representative Steve Driehaus, 52%–48%.[13]

2010

In a rematch, Chabot defeated Driehaus,[14][15] Libertarian Jim Berns, and Green Party nominee Richard Stevenson.[16] Chabot won with 51% of the vote.[17][18]

2012

Chabot defeated Democratic nominee Jeff Sinnard 58%–38%, with Green nominee Rich Stevenson, and Libertarian nominee Jim Berns picking up the balance.[19] He was helped by the 2010 round of redistricting, which shifted the majority of heavily Republican Warren County to the 1st Congressional District.[20]

Tenure

U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chair Ed Royce, members Steve Chabot and Robin Kelly in 2017 celebrate legislation to help educate more girls

On December 18, 2019, Chabot voted against both articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Of the 195 Republicans who voted, all voted against both articles.

On January 7, 2021, Chabot objected to the certification of the 2020 US presidential election results in Congress based on false claims of voter fraud.[21]

In March 2021, he voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[22]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Ohio’s 1st congressional district: Results 1988, 1994–2018[26][27]
YearWinnerVotesPctRunner-upVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
1988Thomas A. Luken (inc.)117,68257%Steve Chabot90,73843%
1994Steve Chabot92,99756%David S. Mann (inc.)72,82244%
1996Steve Chabot (inc.)118,32454%Mark P. Longabaugh94,71943%John G. HalleyNatural Law5,3812%
1998Steve Chabot (inc.)92,42153%Roxanne Qualls82,00347%
2000Steve Chabot (inc.)116,76853%John Cranley98,32845%David A. GroshoffLibertarian3,3992%Richard L. StevensonNatural Law1,9331%
2002Steve Chabot (inc.)110,76065%Greg Harris60,16835%
2004Steve Chabot (inc.)173,43060%Greg Harris116,23540%*
2006Steve Chabot (inc.)105,68052%John Cranley96,58448%
2008Steve Driehaus155,45552%Steve Chabot (inc.)140,68348%*
2010Steve Chabot103,77052%Steven L. Driehaus (inc.)92,67245%Jim A. BernsLibertarian3,0762%Richard L. StevensonNatural Law2,0001%
2012Steve Chabot (inc.)201,90758%Jeff Sinnard131,49038%Jim A. BernsLibertarian9,6743%Richard L. StevensonGreen Party6,6452%
2014Steve Chabot (inc.)124,77963%Fred Kundrata72,60437%
2016Steve Chabot (inc.)210,01459%Michele Young144,64441%
2018Steve Chabot (inc.)154,40951%Aftab Pureval141,11847%Dirk KubalaLibertarian5,3392%
2020Steve Chabot (inc.)199,56052%Kate Schroder172,02245%Kevin KahnLibertarian13,6924%

*Write-in and minor candidate notes: In 2004, Rich Stevenson received 198 votes. In 2008, Eric Wilson received 85 votes and Rich Stevenson received 67 votes. In 2020, Kiumars Kiani received 11 votes.

Political positions

During the presidency of Donald Trump, Chabot voted in line with Trump’s stated position 93.1% of the time.[28] As of September 2021, Chabot had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 13.9% of the time.[29]

Health care

Chabot authored a bill prohibiting a form of late-term abortion called partial-birth abortion, referred to in some medical literature by its less common name of intact dilation and extraction. President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on November 5, 2003.[30][non-primary source needed]

Chabot favors repealing the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). He favors market-based reforms that he claims will offer American families more lower-cost options.[31] He supported the March 2017 version of the American Health Care Act, the GOP’s replacement for Obamacare.[32] On May 4, 2017, Chabot voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act and pass the American Health Care Act.[33][34]

Environment

On the topic of man-made climate change, Chabot has said, “the evidence concerning man-made climate change is far from conclusive”.[35] He has said cap-and-trade is an “extreme proposal” that would harm the economy.[35]

Other

In 1999, Chabot was one of the managers appointed to conduct the impeachment proceedings of President Bill Clinton.[36]

On August 22, 2011, Chabot asked Cincinnati police to confiscate cameras being used by private citizens to record a town-hall meeting, even as media television cameras recorded the incident.[37][38][39] YouTube videos of the incident provided wide awareness of it, and the participating police officer was later disciplined.[40]

In 2002, Chabot advocated teaching intelligent design alongside the theory of evolution by natural selection in Ohio high schools.[41][dead link]

Chabot has called for ending logging subsidies in the Tongass National Forest,[42] and promoted relations with Taiwan.[43] In 2002, he helped spearhead the local campaign against building a light rail system in Hamilton County.[44]

As of 2016, Chabot had traveled on congressional fact-finding missions to 46 countries at a cost of $200,000.[45]

Personal life

Chabot lives with his wife Donna in Westwood. They have two children and a grandson.[46]

References

  1. ^ “chabot”. Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  2. ^ “Steve Chabot About Steve”. Steve Chabot Congress. Retrieved December 2, 2014.
  3. ^ Juliet Eilperin, “Like-Minded Team of 13 to Present House’s Case”, Washington Post, January 14, 1999
  4. ^ Paul Barton, “Chabot guaranteed place in textbooks”, Cincinnati Enquirer, January 14, 1999
  5. ^ “OH District 1 Race – Nov 08, 1988”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  6. ^ “OH District 1 Race – Nov 05, 1996”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  7. ^ “OH District 1 Race – Nov 03, 1998”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  8. ^ “Rep. Steve Chabot (R)”. Almanac of American Politics. Archived from the original on May 16, 2011. Retrieved July 5, 2006.
  9. ^ Wilkinson, Howard (October 28, 1998). “Chabot, Qualls debate pork vs. fair share”. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved October 28, 2009.
  10. ^ a b “OH District 1 Race – Nov 07, 2000”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  11. ^ “OH District 1 Race – Nov 05, 2002”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  12. ^ “OH – District 01 Race – Nov 07, 2006”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  13. ^ “OH – District 01 Race – Nov 04, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  14. ^ Zeleny, Jeff (July 3, 2010). “In Midterm Elections, a Rougher Road for Incumbent Democrats”. The New York Times.
  15. ^ “Politics 2010: Parties play take-away, keep-away in Ohio”. UPI.com. May 2, 2010. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  16. ^ Official Hamilton County Candidates and Issues List Archived October 21, 2010, at the Wayback Machine Hamilton County Ohio Board of Elections
  17. ^ “2010 election results for Ohio”. The New York Times. Retrieved March 11, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ “OH – District 01 Race – Nov 02, 2010”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  19. ^ “Ohio Secretary of State” (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on November 18, 2012.
  20. ^ Exner, Rich (March 7, 2017). “How gerrymandered Ohio congressional districts limit the influence of Ohio voters”. cleveland.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  21. ^ Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (January 7, 2021). “The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  22. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 49”. clerk.house.gov. Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  23. ^ “House & Senate Taiwan Caucus (2019-2020)”. Formosan Association of Public Affiairs. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  24. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  25. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  26. ^ “Election Statistics”. Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Retrieved January 10, 2008.
  27. ^ “2012 Elections Results – Ohio Secretary of State”. Sos.state.oh.us. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  28. ^ Bycoffe, Aaron (January 30, 2017). “Tracking Steve Chabot In The Age Of Trump”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved April 4, 2017.
  29. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  30. ^ “Steve Chabot – Legislative Issues”. US House web site. 2008. Archived from the original on February 2, 2008. Retrieved October 28, 2009.
  31. ^ BieryGolick, Keith (February 1, 2017). “Crashing congressman’s office over ‘Obamacare’ stance”. Cincinnati.com. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  32. ^ “How House Republicans Planned to Vote on the Obamacare Replacement”. The New York Times. March 20, 2017. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 5, 2017.
  33. ^ “How the House voted to pass the GOP health-care bill”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  34. ^ “How every member voted on health care bill”. CNN. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  35. ^ a b “Climate change: ‘We can debate this forever. Cincinnati.com. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  36. ^ Chabot puts impeachment at center of his case for Judiciary post The Hill. 31 May 2018.
  37. ^ Wilkinson, Howard (September 2, 2011). “Chabot camera seizure irks right and left”. Cincinnati.com. Retrieved September 24, 2011.
  38. ^ Wilkinson, Howard “Democrats’ cameras seized by police at Chabot Town Hall meeting”, Cincinnati.com, August 24, 2011
  39. ^ Kurt Nimmo, [1] “Cops Confiscate Cameras at Ohio Congressman’s Town Hall”, August 24, 2011
  40. ^ Wilkinson, Howard (September 20, 2011). “Officer who confiscated cameras at Chabot event gets “administrative insight. Cincinnati.com. Retrieved September 24, 2011.[dead link]
  41. ^ Murray, Iaian (June 5, 2002). “Scientific Boehner: The new creationism and the congressmen who support it”. The American Prospect. Retrieved October 28, 2009.
  42. ^ “Cut it out – Stop spending taxpayers’ money to build roads for timber companies”. The Columbus Dispatch – Editorial. May 16, 2006. Retrieved October 28, 2009.[permanent dead link]
  43. ^ Snyder, Charles (June 30, 2006). “US House adopts measure on Taiwan”. Taipei Times. p. 1. Retrieved October 28, 2009.
  44. ^ Monk, Dan; Lucy May (May 11, 2001). “Missing the bus”. Business Courier of Cincinnati. pp. 1, 12. Retrieved October 28, 2009.
  45. ^ “From Westwood to the World”. Citybeat.com. October 26, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  46. ^ “About Steve | U.S. House of Representatives”. Retrieved November 7, 2018.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
David Mann
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio’s 1st congressional district

1995–2009
Succeeded by
Steve Driehaus
Preceded by
Steve Driehaus
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio’s 1st congressional district

2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Sam Graves
Chair of the House Small Business Committee
2015–2019
Succeeded by
Nydia Velázquez
Preceded by
Nydia Velázquez
Ranking Member of the House Small Business Committee
2019–2021
Succeeded by
Blaine Luetkemeyer
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Barbara Lee
United States representatives by seniority
45th
Succeeded by
John Larson


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Steve Chabot (R)154,40951.3%
Aftab Purevel (D)141,11846.9%
Dirk Kubala (L)5,3391.8%
TOTAL300,866

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

CHABOT, STEVEN J has run in 6 races for public office, winning 5 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $8,259,812.

 

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Committee on Small Business
House Committee on Foreign Affairs
House Committee on the Judiciary

Subcommittees

Middle East, North Africa, and International Terrorism
Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet
Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Foreign Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific
    • Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia
  • Committee on the Judiciary
    • Subcommittee on the Constitution
    • Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition, and the Internet
  • Committee on Small Business

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

  • Budget, Debt, and Spending

    Spending is out-of-control in Washington, and has been for quite some time. Each day, we add to our national debt by spending a lot more than the IRS collects in taxes. As this debt burden continues to grow – it’s now about $20 trillion – we must re…

  • Defense and Security

    Defending our country and protecting our freedoms are the most basic tasks of our federal government. It is vital that we maintain a strong national defense to protect our citizens and support our allies in an increasingly dangerous world. As we prot…

  • Economy, Jobs, and Regulations

    Revitalizing our economy and putting Americans back to work is my top priority in Washington. Unfortunately, families and small businesses are struggling. We need to get Americans back to work, and in order to do that, the federal government must not…

  • Education

    As a former teacher, I understand that every child in America deserves access to a quality education. During my time in Congress, I have made it a priority to see that states and localities are given the flexibility and tools needed to prepare studen…

  • Energy

    America has been blessed with abundant energy resources. Our prosperity depends on reducing our dependence on foreign sources of energy and tapping our resources here at home. In order to move to true energy independence, we must explore the many av…

  • Foreign Policy and Trade

    Since I was first elected to Congress, I have had the opportunity to serve on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. And I have long served on its Asia-Pacific and Middle East and North Africa Subcommittees. An engaged American foreign policy is a v…

  • Health Care

    It is critical that Americans have access to quality, affordable health care. Among the important issues before Congress, Americans consistently consider access to reliable health care for themselves and their loved ones at, or near, the top. Sadly, …

  • Protecting the Unborn

    Government has an obligation to protect the safety of the most vulnerable among us. I believe that life begins at conception, and I will continue to support the rights of the unborn. I have cosponsored numerous bills aimed at protecting and furtherin…

  • Small Business

    Small businesses are the backbone of American’s economy. Our nation’s 29 million small businesses create six out of every ten new jobs, make up the vast majority of exporters and employ about half of all private-sector employees. Throughout my time i…

  • Social Security and Medicare

    Social Security and Medicare provide critical benefits to more than 50 million Americans. Our seniors deserve our respect and our gratitude, and we must protect the benefits they earned by paying into both systems. My mother and my mother-in-law are …

  • Veterans

    We owe our veterans a tremendous debt of gratitude, because it is through their dedication and sacrifices that America remains safe and free. There is not enough we can do to repay the brave men and women in our country’s armed forces for the sacrifi…

Governance

BUDGET, DEBT, AND SPENDING

Spending is out-of-control in Washington, and has been for quite some time.  Each day, we add to our national debt by spending a lot more than the IRS collects in taxes.  As this debt burden continues to grow – it’s now about $20 trillion – we must remember that it will be handed down to our children and grandchildren.  Just as families and businesses balance their own checkbooks, the federal government should be expected to do the same.

I believe that it is critical that lawmakers do everything possible to root out wasteful spending from the federal budget, reduce spending overall, and promote policies that will grow our economy.  In my opinion, one way to help tackle this problem is a constitutional amendment to ensure that future Congresses cannot spend money they do not have.

Economy

Economy, Jobs & Regulation

Revitalizing our economy and putting Americans back to work is my top priority in Washington. Unfortunately, families and small businesses are struggling.  We need to get Americans back to work, and in order to do that, the federal government must not stifle job growth.

With this in mind, it is imperative that Congress pursue pro-growth policies that empower the private sector and limit the size and scope of the federal government.  And we need to support policies that remove obstacles to job creation, including simplifying our complex tax code, ensuring better access to capital, reducing our debt and deficit, and stopping unnecessary federal regulations that are likely to do more harm than good.

Throughout my time in Congress, I have served on the House Committee on Small Business and currently serve as its Chairman.  To see the work I have done to support America’s small businesses, please visit the Committee’s website.

Small Business

Small businesses are the backbone of American’s economy.  Our nation’s 29 million small businesses create six out of every ten new jobs, make up the vast majority of exporters and employ about half of all private-sector employees.

Throughout my time in Congress, I have served on the House Committee on Small Business, where I have had the privilege to champion America’s entrepreneurs.  Currently, I serve as the Chairman of the Committee.  To find out more about the numerous efforts I am leading to strengthen the small business community and the American economy, please visit the Committee’s website.

Education

Education

As a former teacher, I understand that every child in America deserves access to a quality education.  During my time in Congress, I have made it a priority to see that states and localities are given the flexibility and tools needed to prepare students for success in the global economy.

I believe strongly that decisions on how to best educate our children should be made by parents, teachers, and local communities.  That way, our education resources can be focused on helping children get the support they need, instead of being consumed complying with costly mandates from Washington.

Health Care

Health Care

It is critical that Americans have access to quality, affordable health care.  Among the important issues before Congress, Americans consistently consider access to reliable health care for themselves and their loved ones at, or near, the top.  Sadly, although many Americans received coverage through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), often called Obamacare, this law has also made premiums unaffordable and reduced health care options for millions of others. We can do better.

I believe Congress has been given a clear mandate to repeal and replace the ACA, and I have consistently supported doing so.  As the health care debate unfolds, I will continue to work to make health care affordable and accessible to all Americans.

Social Security & Medicare

Social Security and Medicare provide critical benefits to more than 50 million Americans.  Our seniors deserve our respect and our gratitude, and we must protect the benefits they earned by paying into both systems.

My mother and my mother-in-law are now receiving the benefits they earned, just like millions of other hardworking Americans.  As such, I understand firsthand that seniors rely on both of these programs to meet their daily living and health care expenses.  Seniors should have the peace of mind that they will see a return on the investments made throughout their lifetime, and so, I have serious concerns about any reform proposals for either program that would reduce benefits for current beneficiaries.

Infrastructure

Energy

America has been blessed with abundant energy resources.  Our prosperity depends on reducing our dependence on foreign sources of energy and tapping our resources here at home.  In order to move to true energy independence, we must explore the many available domestic energy resources in an environmentally-friendly manner.

I am a supporter of an “all of the above” approach to energy production, including fully developing our own sources of energy and making sure that we don’t slow down the development of new energy production with needless regulation

Social Security

Veterans

Veterans

We owe our veterans a tremendous debt of gratitude, because it is through their dedication and sacrifices that America remains safe and free.  There is not enough we can do to repay the brave men and women in our country’s armed forces for the sacrifices they have made.  I am humbled to be their representative and advocate in Washington.

Our priorities in Washington must reflect our dedication to supporting those who have served our country.  That is why I am a strong supporter of legislation and funding efforts that ensure veterans have access to medical care, education, and financial services.  And throughout my time in Congress, I have also supported numerous measures to give our veterans more choices, improve accountability at the VA, and cut down on its backlog.

In keeping with his support for Veterans, Congressman Steve Chabot is a sponsor of the following:

H.R. 499, the Service-Disabled Veterans Small Business Continuation Act (116th Congress)

Congressman Steve Chabot also supported the following major pieces of legislation passed by the House:

S. 2372, the VA MISSION Act (signed into law in the 115th Congress)

H.R. 1381, the Burn Pit Registry Enhancement Act (116th Congress)

Congressman Steve Chabot is also a co-sponsor of the following legislation:

H.R. 203, the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act (116th Congress)

H.R. 553, the Military Surviving Spouses Equity Act (116th Congress)

H.R. 628, the WINGMAN Act (116th Congress)

H.R. 1424, the Fallen Warrior Battlefield Cross Memorial Act (116th Congress)

H.R. 1615, the VA-SBA Act (116th Congress)

Foreign Policy & Trade

Since I was first elected to Congress, I have had the opportunity to serve on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.  And I have long served on its Asia-Pacific and Middle East and North Africa Subcommittees.

An engaged American foreign policy is a vital part of our success on the world stage.  International cooperation helps achieve our national security objectives through our military alliances and through less formal channels.  Defeating the Islamic State (ISIS), preventing Iran or North Korea from threatening the world with nuclear weapons, and ensuring that countries like Russia and China do not infringe on the territorial sovereignty of their neighbors requires continued communication with our allies abroad.

Trade is also a vital part of foreign policy.  Fairly negotiated trade deals open new markets for American exports and give our small businesses new customers.  These agreements also bring down prices for American consumers.  They must also be properly negotiated to ensure that they put American workers and exporters on a level playing field with foreign competitors.

Protecting the Unborn

Government has an obligation to protect the safety of the most vulnerable among us.  I believe that life begins at conception, and I will continue to support the rights of the unborn.

I have cosponsored numerous bills aimed at protecting and furthering the right to life throughout my time in Congress.  One of my proudest moments was the passage of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003.  That important legislation, which I authored, put an end to the heinous practice of partially delivering an infant only as a means to kill him or her.  I am also committed to supporting and expanding important legal protections for doctors and other health care providers who refuse to perform abortion procedures to which they are morally opposed.

X
Brad WenstrupBrad Wenstrup

Current Position: US Representative for OH 2nd District since 2012
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Physician, US Army Reserve from 1998 – 2013

Featured Quote: 
Inflation does matter. Long-term inflation makes it that much harder for working class families to get by. It also depreciates the value of Americans’ hard-earned retirement savings and makes every-day necessities harder to afford. We can’t spend our way out of this problem.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Brad Wenstrup’s full questioning of Vindman and Williams | Trump impeachment hearings

Washington is on edge Friday night.

National security chiefs have warned the White House about the possibility of another terrorist attack in Kabul over the next few days.

Several thousand more evacuations occurred Friday.

Thirty-six hours after the carnage in Kabul where at least 170 people were killed and more than 200 were wounded, the Pentagon stuck to the planned withdrawal date of Aug. 31.

“I feel sad, I feel angry and I’m doing a lot of praying,” said Congressman Brad Wenstrup in an interview Friday afternoon.

He and Congressman Steve Chabot pulled no punches with their words of reaction to the volatile situation overseas.

“This thing thus far has been such a debacle,” according to Chabot. “I really think it’s the worst foreign affairs disaster that we’ve seen in American history.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OH 2nd District since 2012
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Physician, US Army Reserve from 1998 – 2013

Featured Quote: 
Inflation does matter. Long-term inflation makes it that much harder for working class families to get by. It also depreciates the value of Americans’ hard-earned retirement savings and makes every-day necessities harder to afford. We can’t spend our way out of this problem.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Brad Wenstrup’s full questioning of Vindman and Williams | Trump impeachment hearings

News

Washington is on edge Friday night.

National security chiefs have warned the White House about the possibility of another terrorist attack in Kabul over the next few days.

Several thousand more evacuations occurred Friday.

Thirty-six hours after the carnage in Kabul where at least 170 people were killed and more than 200 were wounded, the Pentagon stuck to the planned withdrawal date of Aug. 31.

“I feel sad, I feel angry and I’m doing a lot of praying,” said Congressman Brad Wenstrup in an interview Friday afternoon.

He and Congressman Steve Chabot pulled no punches with their words of reaction to the volatile situation overseas.

“This thing thus far has been such a debacle,” according to Chabot. “I really think it’s the worst foreign affairs disaster that we’ve seen in American history.”

Twitter

About

Brad Wenstrup 1

Source: Government page

Brad Wenstrup was elected in 2012 to represent the people of Ohio’s Second Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives.  He brings experience as a doctor, Army Reserve officer, Iraq War veteran, and small business owner to help Congress tackle the economic and security challenges facing the nation.

In the 116th Congress, Brad serves on the House Committee on Ways and Means and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He previously spent six years on the Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs. As a member on the Ways and Means and Intelligence Committees, Brad is working to address the national health and systemic poverty issues, while strengthening our national security. He has long been a voice of support for southern Ohio’s veteran community.

A Cincinnati native, Brad graduated from Saint Xavier High School and the University of Cincinnati.  He went on to earn a medical degree in Chicago as a podiatric physician and after completing his surgical residency he established private practice in Cincinnati, treating patients for 26 years.

Brad has served in the U.S. Army Reserve since 1998, currently holding the rank of colonel.  In 2005-06, he served a tour in Iraq as a combat surgeon, and was awarded a Bronze Star and Combat Action Badge for his service.   In 2018, Colonel Wenstrup was awarded the Soldier’s Medal for heroism.

During his time in Congress, Brad is fulfilling his Reserve duties by serving as the Medical Policy Advisor for the Chief of the Army Reserve as well as seeing patients at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda.

Brad and his wife, Monica, reside in Cincinnati with their two children.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

Republican Study Committee
Air Cargo Caucus

Experience

Work Experience

  • Physician,
    Wellington Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine
    1999 to present
  • Combat surgeon
    2005 to 2006

    Iraq

  • Private practice doctor
    1986 to 1999

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1958
Place of Birth: Cincinnati, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Roman Catholic
Spouse: Monica Wenstrup

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2419 Rayburn H.O.B.
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-3164
Fax: (202) 225-1992

Peebles Office
170 North Main St.
Peebles, OH, 45660
Phone: (513) 605-1380
Fax: (937) 798-4024

Anderson Township Office
7954 Beechmont Ave, Suite 200
Cincinnati, OH 45255
Phone: (513) 474-7777
Fax: (513) 605-1377

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Brad Robert Wenstrup (born June 17, 1958)[1] is an American politician, U.S. Army Reserve officer,[2] and doctor of podiatric medicine, who has been the U.S. Representative for Ohio’s 2nd congressional district since 2013. A Republican, he upset incumbent U.S. Representative Jean Schmidt to win the 2012 Republican primary election.

Wenstrup is a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve[3] and an Iraq War veteran. After the shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise on June 14, 2017, Wenstrup attended to Scalise until he was transported to MedStar Washington Hospital Center.[4] For his actions during the shooting, he was awarded the Soldier’s Medal.[5]

Early life, education, and medical career

Wenstrup was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Joan (née Carletti) and Frank John “Jack” Wenstrup. His father was of German, Irish, and English descent, his mother of Italian ancestry. He has a sister, Amy Castellini.[6]

In 1976, Wenstrup graduated from St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati.[7] In 1980, he graduated Omicron Delta Kappa and cum laude with a B.A. in psychology from the University of Cincinnati, where he was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He then attended the Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine of Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, where he earned an B.S. in biology and a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree, graduating in 1985.

Career

Wenstrup practiced podiatric medicine in Cincinnati for more than 24 years[8] before being elected to Congress.

Military service

Wenstrup joined the United States Army Reserve in 1998, attaining the rank of colonel in March 2017.[9] In 2005 and 2006, he served a tour in Iraq with the 344th Combat Support Hospital.[10] He called his deployment “the worst thing that ever happened to me and the best thing I ever got to do.”[11] Wenstrup was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Combat Action Badge.[9]

During Wenstrup’s tour of duty in Iraq, his sister asked what she could send him. He told her, “I wear the same clothes everyday, we’re fed, and most days I’m not leaving the base. But the people here have nothing. They were under an oppressed regime and have had nothing for so long.” His sister helped organize donations of toys, school supplies, and hygiene supplies donated by local companies, and Wenstrup worked with the base chaplain to distribute the donations to the locals.[12]

2009 Cincinnati mayoral election

Wenstrup ran for mayor of Cincinnati against incumbent Democrat Mark Mallory in 2009. Mallory defeated Wenstrup, 54% to 46%.[13]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2012

Wenstrup ran for the U.S. House of Representatives in the newly redrawn Ohio’s 2nd congressional district, held by incumbent Republican U.S. Congresswoman Jean Schmidt. He was endorsed by the Anderson Tea Party and the Ohio Liberty Council, a coalition of Ohio Tea Party groups.[14] In a surprise, he defeated Schmidt in the March Republican primary, 49% to 43%.[15] She carried six counties (all in the district’s eastern part), while Wenstrup won the two most populous counties (both in the western part): Hamilton County and Clermont County.[16]

In the general election, Wenstrup defeated Democratic nominee William R. Smith, 59%–41%.[17][18]

2014

Wenstrup was reelected, defeating Democratic nominee Marek Tyszkiewicz 66%–34%.[19]

2016

Wenstrup was reelected to a third term, defeating Democratic candidates William Smith and Janet Everhard 65%–32.82%–2.17%.[20]

2018

Wenstrup defeated Democratic candidate Jill Schiller, 58% to 41%, to win election to a fourth term.

2020

Wenstrup defeated Democratic candidate Jaime Castle, 61% to 39%, to win a fifth term.[21]

Tenure

Wenstrup began his first term on January 3, 2013. During his first year in office he held an open town hall meeting in each of his congressional district’s eight counties.[citation needed]

In 2013 Wenstrup’s office conducted a customer service survey.[22] According to Roll Call, very few congressional offices have conducted “genuine” surveys of constituents, instead surveying with “loaded” questions designed to achieve certain results.[23] According to the survey, 75% of respondents were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their experience with Wenstrup’s office.[22]

Wenstrup was an original co-sponsor of H.R. 3949, the VA Prescription Data Accountability Act 2017, which became law during the 115th Congress, in 2017. The bill helps protect veterans receiving prescription medications and prevents misuse of such medications.[23]

Controversies

In December 2020, Wenstrup was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[24] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[25][26][27]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” She also reprimanded Wenstrup and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[28][29] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Wenstrup and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit, arguing that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[30]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Wenstrup is married to Monica Wenstrup (Klein), who works as a financial consultant.[32] They have two children.[2] They adopted a daughter in 2019.[33]

References

  1. ^ “Brad Wenstrup”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  2. ^ a b “Biography – U.S. Representative Brad Wenstrup”. wenstrup.house.gov. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  3. ^ Wentling, Nikki. “About Brad – U.S. Representative Brad Wenstrup”. house.gov. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  4. ^ Wentling, Nikki (June 14, 2017). Like I was back in Iraq’: Congressman, combat doc tended to shot Scalise”. Stars and Strips. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  5. ^ Shane, Leo (April 27, 2018). “Congressman awarded Soldier’s Medal for heroism in last year’s baseball team shooting”. Army Times. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  6. ^ “Ancestry of Brad Wenstrup”. ancestry.com. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  7. ^ “Brad Wenstrup”. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  8. ^ “Wenstrup for Congress”. Usabrad.com. Archived from the original on April 15, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  9. ^ a b Wehrman, Jessica (March 4, 2017). “With House colleagues watching, U.S. Rep. Wenstrup receives military promotion”. Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  10. ^ “My Story | U.S. Representative Brad Wenstrup”. wenstrup.house.gov. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  11. ^ Neff, Blake (July 29, 2013). “Iraq War vet takes his fight to Capitol Hill”. The HIll. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  12. ^ Hughes, Amanda (May 2009). “Hero and Healer”. University of Cincinnati – UC Magazine. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  13. ^ “Cincinnati Mayor Race – Nov 03, 2009”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  14. ^ “Wenstrup upsets Schmidt for 2nd Congressional District nomination”. Wcpo.com. March 7, 2012. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  15. ^ “2012 Ohio District 2 Primary”. Politico. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  16. ^ “OH District 2 – R Primary Race – Mar 06, 2012”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  17. ^ “Ohio Congressional District 2 election results”. msnbc.com. Archived from the original on November 10, 2012. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  18. ^ “2014 Elections Results”. ohio.gov. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  19. ^ “Ohio Election Results 2014: House Map by District, Live Midterm Voting Updates”. POLITICO. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  20. ^ “2016 Official Elections Results”. www.sos.state.oh.us. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  21. ^ “Ohio Election Results: Second Congressional District”. The New York Times. November 3, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  22. ^ a b “How to Conduct a Congressional Customer Service Survey – Commentary”. Roll Call. February 3, 2015. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  23. ^ a b Ann, Kuster (November 21, 2017). “Cosponsors – H.R.1545 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): VA Prescription Data Accountability Act 2017”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  24. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  25. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  26. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  27. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  28. ^ Smith, David (December 12, 2020). “Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results”. The Guardian. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  29. ^ “Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit” (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  30. ^ Williams, Jordan (December 11, 2020). “Democrat asks Pelosi to refuse to seat lawmakers supporting Trump’s election challenges”. TheHill. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  31. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  32. ^ Shesgreen, Deirdre (July 3, 2012). “Wenstrup has to plan for nuptials and November campaign”. Politics Extra. Cincinnati: Gannett Company. Archived from the original on July 12, 2012. Retrieved July 17, 2012.
  33. ^ “That’s So Cincinnati: How a dying AIDS patient helped shape Cincinnati Republican’s view on serving others”. Cincinnati.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jean Schmidt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio’s 2nd congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Randy Weber
United States representatives by seniority
197th
Succeeded by
Roger Williams


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Brad Wenstrup (R)166,71457.6%
Jen Schiller (D)119,33341.2%
James Condit Jr. (G)3,6061.2%
TOTAL289,653

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

WENSTRUP, BRAD R has run in 5 races for public office, winning 4 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $5,772,048.

 

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
House Committee on Ways and Means

Subcommittees

Defense Intelligence and Warfighter Support
Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation
Oversight, Worker and Family Support

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Ways & Means
    • Subcommittee on Oversight
    • Subcommittee on Worker & Family Support
  • United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
    • Subcommittee on Defense Intelligence and Warfighter Support
    • Subcommittee on Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

Governance

Budget & Spending

Irresponsible spending and borrowing has been a fact of Congress for the last generation. Now, America faces a debt crisis that threatens our security and prosperity, driven by mandatory spending that is on autopilot towards steeper deficits. Because of this growing debt, we are spending hundreds of billions on interest payments every year – dollars that could and should be going toward actual functions of government rather than our creditors.

We must make spending reforms now to ensure a stronger, better America for tomorrow’s generations. Modernizing our mandatory spending programs will adapt them to better serve Americans in the 21st Century and minimize the debt burden we hand to our children. When it comes to the spending that Congress does vote on every year, we must ensure that balancing our budget is as important a priority as the programs that ask for more funding year after year.

Civil Rights

2nd Amendment Rights

As a gun owner and active member of the U.S. Army Reserve, I approach our Second Amendment rights with a deep respect for firearms. Millions of Americans safely and routinely own and use firearms for hunting, sport, and self-protection. This includes many residents of southern and southwest Ohio, and many of our friends and neighbors. Our founders enumerated firearm ownership as a right alongside the right to free speech and the right to a fair trial in the original Bill of Rights.

As witness to a mass shooting, I know there are legislative steps we can take to make mass-casualty shootings even rarer, including examining how we identify, diagnose, and treat mental illness; promoting strong family structures; and addressing the root causes of violence. I believe that these efforts, especially in regard to gun ownership, will have a more positive and dramatic effect and will lead to increased safety for all Americans.

I have serious concerns that broad attempts to limit the use and sale of firearms for legitimate purposes, such as hunting and self-defense, would not only limit the rights of law-abiding Americans, but would also not solve the problem of gun violence in our nation. As we explore potential policy solutions, we must not forget nor minimize the Second Amendment, which states, “…the right to bear arms shall not be infringed.”

Democracy

The Legislative Process

Laws begin as ideas. First, a representative sponsors a bill. The bill is then assigned to a committee for study. If released by the committee, the bill is put on a calendar to be voted on, debated or amended. If the bill passes by simple majority (218 of 435), the bill moves to the Senate. In the Senate, the bill is assigned to another committee and, if released, debated and voted on. Again, a simple majority (51 of 100) passes the bill. Finally, a conference committee made of House and Senate members works out any differences between the House and Senate versions of the bill. The resulting bill returns to the House and Senate for final approval. The Government Printing Office prints the revised bill in a process called enrolling. The President has 10 days to sign or veto the enrolled bill.

Economy

Agriculture

No one knows agriculture issues better than the farmers who are working their fields every day, and I always enjoy visiting and learning from southern and southwest Ohio’s agricultural leaders. Farmers are America’s original small business owners, and their legacy of hard work remains fundamental to the strength of our nation.

Our district is rich in natural resources and agriculture is an important part of Ohio’s economy.  Corn, soybeans, wheat, and cattle are just a few of our agricultural assets. We need to level the playing field for agriculture so our farmers can better compete and prosper in the global marketplace.  We must also get the government out of the way by keeping taxes and regulations low, allowing farmers to do what they do best without interference from Washington.

Jobs & Economy

The key to a strong economy is a free market system that values the contributions of every American worker. We unlock this growth with lower taxes, innovation, reduced red tape, and empowered consumers. A light regulatory structure – one where businesses and consumers have the freedom and flexibility to operate, innovate, and make real decisions –  is essential to reaching this goal and moving our economy forward. We must ensure the regulations we have are necessary, efficient, and enable growth.

We must also take steps to empower Ohioans to work. Addressing the “skills gap” facing our country is essential to unlocking continued economic advancements. This includes giving our states and local agencies the flexibility to address their region’s unique employment needs, and the resources to equip those currently on the sidelines for entry into the workforce. Ohioans want to work, and America needs a 21st century workforce equipped to build and grow our 21st economy.

Taxes

Every year Americans dread the annual exercise of paying taxes, and it can be a major headache for businesses of all sizes as well. I believe our tax code should be focused on simplicity, fairness, and competitiveness. Over the last few decades, our tax code had lagged in all these areas, dragging our economy and making it harder for families to make ends meet.

In 2017 I was proud to support the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act, which is the most sweeping tax reform law in the last three decades. It provided tax relief to all Americans through lower personal tax rates, a doubled standard deduction (which over two-thirds of taxpayers take), and an expanded child tax credit. It also provides needed tax relief for businesses to energize our economy and make American companies competitive in the global marketplace.

Like a doctor regularly checks in on his or her patients, Congress must routinely examine our tax code for strengths to reinforce and deficiencies to correct. For something so deeply connected to the health of the economy, it is irresponsible to update our tax code only once in a generation. As a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, I will continue to push for updates to the code on a more regular and routine basis, and your feedback on the tax issues that matter most to you is crucial to that goal.

Education

Education

Providing a first-rate education for America’s children is one of our greatest responsibilities and is essential to creating the educated, productive, and innovative workforce that will shape our economy. Students, parents, local school boards, states, and the federal government must work together in order to ensure our children receive the best education possible. To achieve this end, I support efforts to ensure states and local school districts have greater flexibility to pursue the programs and initiatives that best suit their unique needs.

Health Care

Health Care

Health care is a personal issue to each and every Ohioan. When the government gets involved, it’s hard to maintain the decision-making between patients and their doctor. By handing power over health care decisions to federal bureaucrats, we stifle innovation, undermine our individual liberty, and introduce perverse incentives into the health care system.  As a doctor who served patients for over 26 years, I know that America’s health care system is broken, where people are facing higher premiums and higher deductibles.

We need a health care system that keeps the government out of the doctor’s office, protects the doctor-patient relationship, fosters competition and transparency, and increases health care choices.

Infrastructure

Energy

Our nation should be guided by an “all-of-the-above” energy policy that maximizes our resources and promises safe, secure, and affordable American energy. Our energy policy should meet the twin goals of reducing pollution and promoting a healthy environment, while also enabling our economy to thrive and keeping costs low for American consumers. These priorities are not mutually exclusive, and I believe we should strive to meet them together.

I support policies that avoid artificial government restrictions and expand access to all forms of American-made energy, which will create jobs and reduce energy costs. This must be a primary goal as we work to improve our nation’s energy infrastructure. Reducing regulation and encouraging innovation will lead our nation toward a brighter energy future. Ohio has a leading role to play in this future, and I will continue working to ensure we bring down costs for consumers, create good paying jobs, and safeguard access to American energy.

Social Security

Social Security & Medicare

Social Security and Medicare are known as entitlement programs because our seniors have earned the benefits after a lifetime of work and contribution.

We need to maintain a strong and viable Social Security and Medicare program for our seniors. I know that our nation’s seniors rely on the promises that were made to them for their future health care and retirement security. For far too long, politicians have failed to be honest about the fiscal state of Medicare and Social Security, and this false sense of security is putting the health and retirement of all Americans at risk. In the next two decades alone, nearly 80 million Americans will become eligible for Social Security benefits – putting the financial health of the program in jeopardy.

Rising health care costs and a growing older population that is living longer are threatening to bankrupt these vital programs.  Doing nothing is not an option – it would necessarily mean reduced future benefits.  In order to ensure that Medicare and Social Security remain viable for both today’s and tomorrow’s seniors, we need to preserve these programs for those in or near retirement and modernize them for younger generations by increasing competition, modernizing how benefits are calculated, encouraging additional ways to save for retirement, and empowering individuals to have more control over their care. My goal is to ensure that Social Security and Medicare meet the needs of seniors and taxpayers, now and into the future.

If you ever have a problem with your Social Security or Medicare benefits, don’t hesitate to reach out to my office for assistance. Call my office at (513) 474-7777 and let my staff know what problems you are having.

Veterans

Veterans

As a veteran of the Iraq War, I have seen the heroism and sacrifice of members of our military firsthand.  Our district is rich in military families and veterans, and I believe that our country owes them an enormous debt of gratitude. I will continue to work to ensure our troops and their loved ones receive the first class benefits they have earned. Ever since I came to Congress, I have worked tirelessly toward this goal. I served for more than five years on the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, where I worked closely on crucial legislation to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). While I was chairman of the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Health, I worked to ensure that our veterans receive the quality healthcare they have earned. I will continue to work toward that goal going forward.

These are just a few of the issues facing veterans today. Rest assured that I will continue to conduct rigorous oversight of the VA, reform the management and administration of the VA, and ensure veterans can obtain the benefits they earned through their service.

If you ever have a problem dealing with the VA, don’t hesitate to reach out to my office for assistance. Call my office at (513) 474-7777 and let my staff know what problems you are having. Veterans deserve the best, and I won’t stop working to ensure our government lives up to that standard.

Foreign Policy

As Ronald Reagan often cited, the United States of America is a shining city upon a hill in the world.

After defeating fascism in WWII, America led the way in establishing rules and norms that have created 70 years of growth and protected against another world war. It is up to American leadership to continue to lead on the values we know are important for human flourishing like free markets and freedom of expression.

As the world grows closer together through technology and trade, new threats are emerging. Countries like Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea, along with non-state actors, all threaten to destabilize the post-Cold War order. We, in collaboration with our allies, must not shrink away from answering the new threats we face in the 21st Century. The alternative is to cede global leadership to causes that are antithetical to our American values, and that is unacceptable.

Pro-Life & Family Issues

Families are the building block of our society, and where our next generation grows into the world. A stable and healthy home life is critical to children going on to lead successful and productive lives. That home life starts with parents, and we must empower families, the support systems provided to them, and the communities in which they live to raise their children.

I firmly believe that all human life is sacred and should be protected at every stage, and I am working to advance the cause for life in Congress. I agree with the Founding Fathers, who correctly placed life first among the list of rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence, and I will continue to serve as a strong and active advocate to protect the rights of the unborn and the most vulnerable in our society.

X
Joyce BeattyJoyce Beatty

Current Position: US Representative for OH 3rd District since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1999 – 2008

Featured Quote: 
You can arrest me. You can’t stop me. You can’t silence me.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Joyce Beatty arrested during voting rights demonstration in Washington D.C.

These members of Congress are keeping the pressure on the Senate over voting rights — even if it means arrest
Business Insider, Azmi Haroun and Taiyler Simone Mitchell August 25, 2021 (Long)
Rep. Joyce Beatty taken into custody during demonstration on July 15, 2021
Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio is taken into custody by U.S. Capitol Police officers in the Hart Senate Office Building, after a demonstration supporting voting rights, July 15, 2021, in Washington. 
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Rep. Joyce Beatty of Ohio was arrested by Capitol Police on July 15, while leading a demonstration advocating for voting rights at a Senate office building.

Beatty chairs the Congressional Black Caucus and called for passage of the For the People Act as well as the John Lewis Voting Rights Act.

“I stand in solidarity with Black women and allies across the country in defense of our constitutional right to vote. We have come too far and fought too hard to see everything systematically dismantled and restricted by those who wish to silence us,” Rep. Beatty said in a statement after her arrest. “Be assured that this is just the beginning. This is Our Power, Our Message.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OH 3rd District since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1999 – 2008

Featured Quote: 
You can arrest me. You can’t stop me. You can’t silence me.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Joyce Beatty arrested during voting rights demonstration in Washington D.C.

News

These members of Congress are keeping the pressure on the Senate over voting rights — even if it means arrest
Business Insider, Azmi Haroun and Taiyler Simone Mitchell August 25, 2021 (Long)
Rep. Joyce Beatty taken into custody during demonstration on July 15, 2021
Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio is taken into custody by U.S. Capitol Police officers in the Hart Senate Office Building, after a demonstration supporting voting rights, July 15, 2021, in Washington. 
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Rep. Joyce Beatty of Ohio was arrested by Capitol Police on July 15, while leading a demonstration advocating for voting rights at a Senate office building.

Beatty chairs the Congressional Black Caucus and called for passage of the For the People Act as well as the John Lewis Voting Rights Act.

“I stand in solidarity with Black women and allies across the country in defense of our constitutional right to vote. We have come too far and fought too hard to see everything systematically dismantled and restricted by those who wish to silence us,” Rep. Beatty said in a statement after her arrest. “Be assured that this is just the beginning. This is Our Power, Our Message.”

Twitter

About

Joyce Beatty 1

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Joyce Beatty is a native Ohioan with a strong history of connecting people, policy and politics to make a difference. Since 2013, Beatty has proudly represented Ohio’s Third Congressional District.

Beatty serves on the exclusive House Committee on Financial Services and is a member of two Subcommittees: Housing and Insurance and Oversight and Investigations. The Financial Services Committee oversees the entire financial services industry, including the nation’s banking, securities, insurance, and housing industries, as well as the work of the Federal Reserve, the United States Department of the Treasury and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

Prior to her service in the U.S. House of Representatives, Congresswoman Beatty was Senior Vice President of Outreach and Engagement at The Ohio State University and a member in the Ohio House of Representatives for five terms. During her tenure in the Ohio House, she rose to become the first female Democratic House Leader in Ohio’s history and was instrumental in spearheading and enacting legislation to require financial literacy in Ohio’s public school curriculum, to expand STEM education, and to secure funds to help under- and uninsured women access breast and cervical cancer treatment.

In 2014, Congresswoman Beatty’s efforts proved pivotal in securing nearly $4 million in federal funds to address Columbus’ infant mortality rate, which is one of the highest in the country. In the same year, she also brought then-Department of House and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan to the Third Congressional District to announce a $225 million project to revitalize the Near East Side, led by nearly $30 million in federal funds.

A longtime advocate and champion to end human trafficking, during the 114th Congress, Congresswoman Beatty’s bipartisan legislation to combat child sex trafficking unanimously passed the House of Representatives in 2015 and was signed into law as part of a larger measure, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act, by President Obama. That same year, Congresswoman Beatty introduced legislation that made the tax deduction for out-of-pocket expenses paid by elementary and secondary teachers for supplies and expenses permanent. Her bill, the Reimburse Educators who Pay for Academic Year (REPAY) Supplies Act of 2015, was later included in the bipartisan tax package, the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015, and was signed into law on December 18, 2015.

In 2015, Beatty also introduced the Housing Financial Literacy Act of 2015 to improve first-time homebuyers’ financial knowledge by providing a discount on Federal Housing Administration (FHA) backed mortgage insurance premiums upon successful completion of a HUD certified housing counseling course.

Recently, she introduced the Free Credit Score Act, legislation to require consumer reporting agencies to include a credit score when providing consumers with a free annual credit report. In addition, Beatty authored the Jumpstart Housing Opportunities Utilizing Small Enterprises (HOUSE) Act, or Jumpstart HOUSE Act, which would reauthorize the State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) for eight years and require state business development agencies to set aside the lesser of $2.5 million or 10 percent of unobligated SSBCI funds for small businesses to purchase, rehabilitate, or operate affordable housing units. She also played a major role, alongside other federal and local officials, in helping the City of Columbus win the Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Smart City Challenge, a nationwide competition powered by a pledge of up to $40 million in federal funds to transform one mid-size city’s transportation network and make it safer, easier to use and more reliable.

Congresswoman Beatty is a committed and vocal supporter of the Congressional Black Caucus, concussion awareness and education legislation, and the Office of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWI), which seeks to increase the participation of women and minorities in all facets of the financial marketplace.

A sought after public speaker and the recipient of numerous awards, she was previously named one of Ebony Magazine’s 150 most powerful African-Americans in the United States.

Congresswoman Beatty is active in The Links, Inc., Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Columbus Urban League, The American Heart Association—where she previously served on the board—and numerous other organizations.

Beatty received her Bachelor of Arts from Central State University, her Master of Science from Wright State University, and completed all requirements but her dissertation for a doctorate at the University of Cincinnati. In addition, she has been awarded honorary doctorate degrees from Ohio Dominican University and Central State University.

Congresswoman Beatty is married to attorney Otto Beatty, Jr. and a proud grandmother of two toddlers who lovingly call her “Grammy.”

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

Bipartisan Congressional Bus Caucus
Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism
Collegiate Sports Caucus
Congressional Arthritis Caucus
Congressional Black Caucus (Vice-Chair)
Congressional Black Caucus Taskforce on Economic Development and Wealth Creation
Congressional Brain Injury Task Force
Congressional Caucus on Diabetes
Congressional Caucus on Human Trafficking
The Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues
Congressional Civility and Respect Caucus (Co-Founder and Co-Chair)
Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition (Co-Chair)
Congressional Inventions Caucus
Congressional Somalia Caucus
Congressional TRIO Caucus
Congressional Voting Rights Caucus (Deputy Vice-Chair)
Democratic Caucus Committee on Organization, Study and Review
Democratic Policy and Communications Committee
Direct Selling Caucus
Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus (Co-Chair)
Gun Violence Prevention Task Force
House Democratic Caucus
House NIH Caucus
Investment in America’s Skilled Workforce Caucus
Medicare for All Caucus
Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Regional Leadership:
Whip—Region 10

Experience

Work Experience

  • Senior vice president of outreach and engagement
    Ohio State University
    2008 to 2012
  • President
    Joyce Beatty & Associates
    1992 to present
  • Ohio State Representative
    1999 to 2008

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1950
Place of Birth: Dayton, OH
Gender: Female
Religion: Christian: Baptist
Spouse: Otto Beatty Jr.
Children: Laurel Beatty, Otto Beatty III

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2303 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: 202-225-4324
Fax: 202-225-1984

Columbus Office
471 East Broad Street, Suite 1100
Columbus, OH 43215
Phone: 614-220-0003
Fax: 614-220-5640

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Joyce Marie Beatty (/ˈbti/; née Birdsong, March 12, 1951) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Ohio’s 3rd congressional district since 2013, and as chair of the Congressional Black Caucus since 2021. A member of the Democratic Party, Beatty represented the 27th district in the Ohio House of Representatives from 1999 to 2008, serving for a time as minority leader. She was also previously the Senior Vice-President for Outreach and Engagement at the Ohio State University.

In 2012, Beatty ran in the newly redrawn Ohio’s 3rd congressional district, based in Columbus, and won the Democratic primary, defeating former U.S. Representative Mary Jo Kilroy.[1] She went on to defeat Republican Chris Long in the general election.[2] Beatty was married to Otto Beatty Jr., who was also a former Ohio state representative.

Early life, family, education, and early political career

Beatty was born in Dayton, Ohio. She has a B.A. in speech from Central State University, an M.S. in counseling psychology from Wright State University in 1975,[3] and has studied at the doctoral level at the University of Cincinnati. Beatty served as the Montgomery County Health and Human Services Director responsible for administering the county’s health levy and area public nursing homes, including Stillwater Nursing Home. In 2003, she received an honorary doctorate from the Ohio Dominican University. Beatty served as a delegate for John Kerry on the Ohio delegation to the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston.[4]

Beatty was married to attorney and former State Representative Otto Beatty Jr. She has been a national spokesperson for the American Heart Association. She served on the Columbus American Heart Association Board, Ohio Democratic Committee, Women’s Fund, NAACP, and Delta Sigma Theta sorority. In addition, she was a legislative chair of The Links and a chair of the Columbus Urban League Board. She won the 2002 YWCA Woman of Achievement Award, the Ohio Health Speaking of Women Health Award, NAACP Freedom Award, Woman of Courage Award, and the Urban League Leadership Recognition Award.[5]

Ohio House of Representatives (1999–2009)

Elections

In 1999, longtime State Representative Otto Beatty Jr. of Ohio’s 21st House district decided to resign early to begin an opportunity in the private sector. His wife, Joyce Beatty, was appointed to his seat. She won a full term in 2000 with 82% of the vote.[6][7] After redistricting, she decided to run in the newly redrawn Ohio’s 27th House district and was reelected in 2002 with 82% of the vote.[8] In 2004, she was reelected to a third term unopposed.[9] In 2006, she was reelected to a fourth term with 87% of the vote.[10] Term limits kept Beatty from seeking another term in 2008.[citation needed]

Tenure

After Chris Redfern left to become chair of the Ohio Democratic Party, Beatty was named minority leader. She served in that capacity during the Ohio 127th General Assembly. She was the first female Democratic House leader in Ohio history.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives

2012 election and tenure

On March 6, 2012, Beatty defeated former Congresswoman Mary Jo Kilroy, Columbus city councilwoman Priscilla Tyson, and state representative Ted Celeste 38%–35%-15%-12% to win the Ohio 3rd congressional district Democratic primary.[1] She received early support from the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman, and various other Central Ohio political figures, including Representative Tracy Maxwell Heard and former Representative W. Carlton Weddington.[12]

Between 2013 and 2020, five of the 88 bills Beatty sponsored became law, all wrapped into broader bills.[13] In 2020, she noted she had “helped to secure” local funding for the revitalization of parts of Dayton and research at Ohio State.[13]

2020 election

Starting in late 2019 and into early 2020, Beatty was campaigning for her fifth term as the representative of Ohio’s 3rd congressional district. She faced her first primary challenge since she was elected in 2012,[14] with the Columbus Dispatch writing that the “winner of the Democratic primary almost certainly will go to Washington representing the heavily Democratic district.” At the end of 2019, it was reported she had $1.7 million in her campaign account.[15] In February 2020, she was criticized for accepting campaign contributions from financial services PACs while also overseeing the House Financial Services Committee.[15][14][13] According to FollowTheMoney.org, at the time, Beatty had raised $5.1 million as a candidate for the U.S. and Ohio Houses, of which $1.5 million was from the finance, insurance and real estate industries. In her defense, she argued she had a “record of grilling bank executives who come before her committee and that much of the money from those PACs came from lower-level employees,” and that while Congress needed campaign finance reform, the PAC contributions were “legal under current rules”.[13]

In March 2020, The Intercept reported that Beatty and her husband sold one of their Columbus properties in 2013[16][17] “to a developer while Otto Beatty sat on the zoning board that approved the sale”, leading to accusations of gentrification and “money in politics” by Beatty’s political opposition. Beatty called the criticism a “distortion” of her husband’s record. Otto Beatty, in an interview with The Dispatch, said his wife had nothing to do with the property’s pricing: it had been sold when Otto Beatty was on the Downtown Commission, which “reviewed a request to demolish the existing structures on the property and replace them with a high-rise apartment building”. Arguing at the time in favor of demolition and redevelopment, Otto Beatty noted he did not take part in the final vote.[17]

On April 28, 2020, Beatty won the Democratic primary, defeating challenger Morgan Harper, a self-described progressive. Harper, who had been backed by the Sunrise Movement, a group that backed Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, lost with 32% of the vote to Beatty’s 68%.[18][19] Beatty defeated Republican nominee Mark Richardson with 71% of the vote.[20]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Compensation

On June 21, 2013, the National Journal published an article, “Nearly One in Five Members of Congress Gets Paid Twice”, that reported that Beatty’s state pension of $253,323 is the highest, and, combined with her congressional salary, was greater than President Obama’s total government compensation.[22]

Arrest

On July 15, 2021, Beatty was one of nine protesters the United States Capitol Police arrested for illegally demonstrating in the Hart Senate Office Building.[23] She and approximately 20 other voting rights protesters sought to push the Senate to support the For the People and John Lewis Voting Rights Acts. After multiple warnings from the police, Beatty was arrested for violating a Washington, D.C. law against “crowing, obstructing, or incommoding”.[24]

Political positions

Defense

Beatty voted for a defense bill that included $1.3 billion for fencing at the US-Mexico border.[25]

Environment

Beatty supports “parts of” the Green New Deal.[14]

Abortion

Beatty is pro-choice.[26]

Cannabis

At one point, Beatty opposed legalizing cannabis for recreational use,[26] but in December 2020, she voted for the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment, and Expungement (MORE) Act (HR 3884), which would remove cannabis from the federal Controlled Substances Act, provide a pathway for expungements and resentencing for marijuana convictions, and create a community reinvestment fund to help create an equitable cannabis industry.[27]

Economy

Beatty opposes decreasing corporate taxes to support economic growth.[26]

Health care

Beatty supported Obamacare and opposed its repeal. In 2019, she introduced the End Price Gouging For Insulin Act bill, which would lower insulin prices nationwide. Beatty’s father was diabetic, as is her husband. She has supported efforts in Ohio by Hearcel Craig and Beth Liston to regulate insulin prices.[28] In 2019 she supported “some of” the “health-care fixes that focus on smaller changes to Obamacare rather than a complete overhaul of the system.”[14] In March 2020, she voted with a majority of U.S. representatives for a $8.3 billion bill to combat COVID-19.[17]

Beatty discusses why she voted in support of the Articles of Impeachment.

Impeachment

Beatty supported both the first and second impeachments of Donald Trump.[29][30][31]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b “2016 Election Results: President Live Map by State, Real-Time Voting Updates”. Election Hub. Retrieved 2018-11-05.
  2. ^ “Ex-Ohio Rep. Beatty wins new US House district”. sfgate.com. Retrieved 8 November 2012.
  3. ^ “Making a career of beginnings”, AlumNews, Wright State University Alumni Association, 12 (4), p. 13, Spring 1991
  4. ^ “Congresswoman Joyce Beatty”. United States House of Representatives. 11 December 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  5. ^ “Ohio Ladies Gallery”. Ohio Ladies Gallery. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  6. ^ “OH State House 21 Race – Nov 07, 2000”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  7. ^ “2000 general election results”. Archived from the original on June 27, 2011. Retrieved September 13, 2011.
  8. ^ “OH State House 27 Race – Nov 05, 2002”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  9. ^ “OH State House 27 Race – Nov 02, 2004”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  10. ^ “OH State House 27 Race – Nov 07, 2006”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  11. ^ “Beatty For Congress”. Beatty For Congress. 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  12. ^ “Beatty For Congress”. Beatty For Congress. 2009-03-25. Archived from the original on 2012-03-06. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
  13. ^ a b c d “US Rep. Joyce Beatty touts experience in primary race”, The Columbus Dispatch, Rick Rouan (February 26, 2020)
  14. ^ a b c d “Beatty gets challenge as candidates line up for central Ohio congressional seats”, The Columbus Dispatch, Rich Rouan (December 17, 2019)
  15. ^ a b “Morgan Harper seeks bold policies as progressive primary challenger to Democratic Rep. Joyce Beatty”, The Columbus Dispatch, Rick Rouan (February 26, 2020)
  16. ^ Cunningham-Cook, Matthew (March 3, 2020). “Rep. Joyce Beatty Gentrified Her Way Into Political Trouble”.
  17. ^ a b c “Rep. Joyce Beatty calls Morgan Harper’s attack on real-estate deal ‘desperate’”, The Columbus Dispatch, Anna Staver and Rick Rouan (March 4, 2020)
  18. ^ “Incumbent Democrat Joyce Beatty wins Ohio primary against liberal Morgan Harper”. Reuters. 29 April 2020.
  19. ^ “Sunrise Movement launches first wave of Congressional primary endorsements, fortifying Green New…”. December 12, 2019.
  20. ^ “Live results: 2020 Ohio House primaries”. Washington Post.
  21. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Black Caucus. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  22. ^ “Nearly One in Five Members of Congress Gets Paid Twice – NationalJournal.com”.
  23. ^ Miller, Andrew (2021-07-15). “US Capitol Police arrest Rep. Joyce Beatty during voting rights protest in Hart Senate Office Building”. Fox News. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  24. ^ Wu, Nicholas (July 15, 2021). “Black Caucus Chair arrested during protest in Capitol complex”. POLITICO. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  25. ^ Schladen, Marty (February 3, 2020). “Democrats Beatty, Harper pull no punches at congressional debate”. Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  26. ^ a b c “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Vote Smart. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  27. ^ “Roll Call 235 Roll Call 235, Bill Number: H. R. 3884, 116th Congress, 2nd Session”. 4 December 2020.
  28. ^ Smith, Mary (12 December 2019). “Ohio congresswoman introduces bill to lower insulin prices”. WKRC. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  29. ^ Staver, Anna. “Rep. Beatty says she supports impeachment and thinks some Republicans do, too”. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  30. ^ Rowland, Darrel. “How Ohioans in Congress justified their impeachment resolution vote”. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 2020-06-02.
  31. ^ Evans, Nick (7 January 2021). “Rep. Joyce Beatty Supports Impeachment If Cabinet Doesn't Remove Trump”. radio.wosu.org. Retrieved 2021-01-18.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Mike Turner
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio’s 3rd congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Karen Bass
Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus
2021–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Andy Barr
United States representatives by seniority
162nd
Succeeded by
Ami Bera


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Joyce Beatty (D)181,57573.6%
Jim Burgess (R)65,04026.4%
TOTAL246,615

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

BEATTY, JOYCE has run in 9 races for public office, winning 8 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $6,254,675.

 

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Committee on Financial Services
Housing, Community Development, and Insurance

Subcommittees

Diversity and Inclusion
Oversight and Investigations

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Committee on Financial Services
Joint Economic Committee
Subcommittees:
Diversity and Inclusion (Chair)
Housing, Community Development, and Insurance
Oversight and Investigations

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

 

Governance

Budget

The federal budget is a statement of our nation’s priorities and should be a blueprint that reflects our shared values. That is why I believe we should make responsible investments in all levels of education, expand access to high-quality, affordable healthcare, rebuild our crumbling infrastructure, protect Social Security, Medicare, and Veterans, and create innovative programs that will contribute to the success of Central Ohioans and all Americans.

Civil Rights

Civil Rights

I have worked my entire life to advance equal rights for all Americans and to create an America where each and every one of us has equal opportunity, regardless of how we look, who we love, or what we believe. Everyone should be able to live their lives free from discrimination based on race, gender, ethnicity, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender-identity, political affiliation, national origin, and disability status.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Civil Rights

Elected Vice Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, which is committed to ensuring that African Americans and other marginalized communities have full access to the American Dream.
Supports the Equality Act, to extend civil rights protections to LBGTQ individuals.
Sponsor of an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution.

Elections and Voting Rights

The right to vote is among the most fundamental rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, and any attempt to infringe upon that right poses a serious threat to our democracy. I am committed to making it easier for Americans to vote, not harder. In addition, I am leading the charge against voter purge initiatives in Ohio and across the nation.

Highlights of Beatty Work to Protect Voting Rights

Introduced the Save Voters Act to prohibit states from using the same type of questionable voter purge tactics that Ohio has used to take thousands of eligible voters off the voting rolls.
Sponsor of a constitutional amendment to reverse the Supreme Court’s Citizens United case and reduce the influence of money in our elections.
Supports legislation to update the Voting Rights Act to protect every Americans’ right to vote.
Deputy Vice Chair of the Congressional Voting Rights Caucus

Economy

Diversity & Inclusion

I am proud to serve as the first-ever Chair of the Financial Services Committee’s Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion. As Chair, my goal is to bring diversity and inclusion to the forefront of the conversation on how to make the financial services industry and all industries work for every American. Diversity and inclusion must become part of the overall fabric of the companies and industries that are the engines of our economy. The evidence is irrefutable that diversity and inclusion are good for the bottom line.

Women and minorities have made great strides throughout our country’s history, yet much more needs to be done to address the social, economic, and political disparities that still exist today. These disparities are institutional, and only by naming them and addressing them systematically will we be able to eliminate them.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Diversity and Inclusion

Chairwoman of the Financial Services Committee Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion.
Author of the Ensuring Diverse Leadership Act to provide more opportunities for woman and minorities at the highest levels of the Federal Reserve.
Original cosponsor of the Paycheck Fairness Act to close the wage gap.
Supports reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and funding for VAWA programs.

Financial Services and Consumer Protection

As a senior Member of the Financial Services Committee and Member of the Joint Economic Committee, I am fighting to ensure an economy and financial services system that works for ALL Americans.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Financial Services and Consumer Protection

Co-Chair of the House Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus.
Authored the Financial Literacy College Education Act to establish best practices to teach financial literacy at institutions of higher education. The bill was signed into law in the 115th Congress.
Passed the Free Credit Scores for Consumers Act out of the Financial Services Committee to provide consumers with free access to their credit scores.
One of the lead Democrats on the Consumers First Act, a bill to make sure consumers’ interests are placed before the interests of corporations.
Leader on efforts to ensure the Treasury Department places Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill.

Jobs and the Economy

America is strongest when we have a robust and thriving economy coupled with access to good-paying jobs. While the economy has mostly recovered from the Great Recession, we know that far too many families have not seen a pay raise in decades and the racial wealth gap continues to widen. A strong economy is only valuable when it lifts the prospects of all Americans, not merely those wealthy enough to invest in the stock market. That is why I will continue to advocate for legislation that stimulates economic growth while ensuring that all workers’ rights, including the right to unionize, are protected and celebrated.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Jobs and the Economy

Supports the Raise the Wage Act to gradually increase the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour.
Sponsor of the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act and Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act to strengthen collective bargaining rights.

Small Business

As a former small business owner, I understand the unique challenges small business owners face. Supporting entrepreneurship creates millions of American jobs and is the best way to spur innovation, preserve community character, and ensure economic prosperity for generations to come.

Trade & Manufacturing

U.S. trade agreements need to benefit American workers, manufacturers, consumers, and the environment. That is why I will only support trade agreements that are fair to American workers and manufacturers. If given a level playing field, I know that American workers can compete and win in the global economy.

Education

Education

As a former college administrator, I wholeheartedly support programs that ensure access to high-quality education, from childhood to adulthood. Our nation’s elementary, secondary, and higher education institutions provide the next generation with the much-needed skills and opportunities to compete in the 21st century economy. Making a better system for them also means looking for avenues to address the racial and gender disparities in our education system from pre-K through college.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Education

Author of the 21st Century STEM for Girls and Underrepresented Minorities Act to provide science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) school programs for girls and other groups underrepresented in STEM fields.
Leads the effort in Congress to provide funding for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Excellence in Research Program within the National Science Foundation (NSF).
Secured tens of millions of dollars in funding for Head Start programs in the Columbus area.

Environment

Climate Change and the Environment

The consensus view of scientists about the impact that climate change poses to our planet is alarming. Rising temperatures are projected to devastate many of our planet’s precious ecosystems, increase coastal flooding to dangerous levels, disrupt our food systems, and increase extreme weather occurrences.

These science-backed facts are why I support taking bold steps to invest in federal programs to address climate change, prevent spending cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), fully enforce the Clean Air Act, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, minimize our reliance on fossil fuels, and promote energy efficiency and conservation. I also support the Paris Climate Agreement and believe the United States should remain a full partner in the international effort to address climate change.

Health Care

Health Care

All Americans should have access to affordable, high-quality healthcare, including those with pre-existing conditions. I will continue to work to protect and strengthen the Affordable Care Act, while moving toward a “Medicare-For-All-Who-Want-It” program which would give Americans the option to access a Medicare-type system in lieu of private insurance. I also will continue supporting federal investment in groundbreaking medical research, life-saving therapies, and innovative technologies to ensure the health and well-being of generations of Americans.

In addition, I strongly believe that women’s reproductive decisions should be made between them and their doctor.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Healthcare

Member of the Medicare for All Caucus.
Co-Chair of the Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition.
Leads the effort to fund the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Author of the Concussion Awareness and Education Act to require the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) to coordinate research on youth and sports-related concussions.
Author of the Return to Work Awareness Act, to provide resources for survivors of stroke and other serious illnesses to return to the workforce.

Immigration

Foreign Affairs & Immigration

I understand the important role that the United States plays in providing aid to those who need it around the world. Foreign assistance is a modest investment in a healthier and more stable world, and I am proud to live in a nation that routinely delivers international humanitarian aid. That is why I have consistently supported funding for global health and nutrition programs, refugee and disaster assistance, and the Peace Corps, to name just a few examples. Additionally, I believe we need an immigration system grounded in common sense and accountability that also addresses the issue of citizenship for undocumented immigrants who have been here for years.

Immigration

We are a nation of immigrants. As such, we need an immigration system that reflects those values, one that is humane and grounded in common sense and accountability. We cannot separate families, lock refugees in cages, or deny children access to food, water, or necessities.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Immigration

Supports the American Dream and Promise Act to provide Dreamers, who have known no other home besides the United States, and Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients a pathway to citizenship.
Sponsor of the Keep Families Together Act to end the policy of family separation at the border and other bills to address the humanitarian crisis at our southern border

Infrastructure

Transportation and Infrastructure

I believe that sustained investments in our infrastructure—including roads, bridges, railways, airports, and mass transit systems—are a commonsense approach to strengthening our economy, creating jobs, and building opportunities for long-term economic growth. That means working to increase the reach and accessibility of public transportation while investing in a robust, multimodal transportation system with an eye towards the future.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Transportation and Infrastructure

Helped Columbus secure the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Smart City Challenge that brought tens of millions of dollars to transform Central Ohio’s transportation network.

Safety

Gun Violence

36,000 Americans are killed by guns every year: equivalent to the population of many Ohio cities. We as a nation have become numb to that statistic. We must do more to close loopholes and advance sensible gun reform legislation.

Highlights of Beatty Work to Address Gun Violence

Author of the Safer America for Everyone Right Now Act, or SAFER Now Act, which takes a comprehensive approach to the multifaceted problem of gun violence by incorporating a number of widely supported proposals that will keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people and take the most dangerous weapons out of circulation.
Supports the Bipartisan Background Checks Act to close background check loopholes. The bill represents the first meaningful gun violence prevention legislation to pass the House in a generation.

Social Security

Seniors

I am fighting to protect the benefits that seniors worked hard to earn. That is why I support strengthening and expanding Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, as well as upholding the promises made to America’s seniors by improving these programs and by ensuring their long-term solvency. Our seniors worked a lifetime to live their golden years with dignity, and I will make sure that promise is kept.

Highlights of Beatty Work for Seniors

Sponsor of the Social Security 2100 Act to expand Social Security benefits and ensure the solvency of the program for the long-term.
Sponsor of the Social Security Fairness Act to end the Government Pension Offset and Windfall Elimination Provision in Social Security.
Supports the Rehabilitation for Multiemployer Pensions Act to shore up the multi-employer pension system.

Veterans

Veterans

We have an obligation to our country’s servicemembers and veterans. These brave Americans and their families make enormous sacrifices for our country every day. That is why I remain strongly committed to our current and former members of the Armed Forces and to making sure we keep our promises to them when they return from service.

Highlights of Beatty Work for Veterans

Author of the Homeless Veterans Legal Services to allow the Department of Veterans Affairs to partner with nonprofits to provide legal services to homeless veterans.
Spearheaded designation of the National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus.

Affordable Housing

Owning a home has long been at the cornerstone of the American Dream.

That is why I will continue to support and develop programs that make home ownership more accessible to the average American. This is especially important as Central Ohio remains one of the fastest growing areas of the country. At the same time, we must ensure that renters’ rights are protected and expanded to protect against abusive and discriminatory housing practices.

Highlights of Beatty Work on Housing and Affordability

Author of the Housing Financial Literacy Act to provide first-time homebuyers a discount on their mortgage insurance premium if they complete a financial counseling program.
Secured $25 million to revitalize Columbus’ Near East side.
Supports funding for housing assistance programs.
Supports funding for McKinney Vento Homeless Assistance grants.

Local Issues

Ohio’s Third Congressional District reflects the rich diversity, vibrance, and tenacity of America. I am proud to call the Third District my home, and will continue to work tirelessly to keep it growing and prospering.

Science and Technology

Groundbreaking scientific and technological advances have propelled our country forward and vastly improved the world in which we live. We need to continue investing in programs that have made us the global leader in innovation, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF), as well as research and development funding at the Department of Defense.

Working Families and Children

We have a responsibility to support the most vulnerable among us, which is why I’ve spent my time in Congress fighting for families. This includes supporting bills to institute paid family leave, expand the child tax credit, and provide child care for working families, because these kinds of programs are investments in the future stability of our country.

One child living in poverty is one too many. That is why I strongly support food security programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). These programs ensure the overall health and well-being of countless Americans, including more than 50,000 households in Ohio’s Third Congressional District.

I am also leading the charge in Congress on the issue of human trafficking. Children, women, and men are being preyed upon and—while progress has been made to expose, raise awareness, and provide support to victims—we must continue to do more.

Highlights of Beatty Work for Youth and Families

Secured over $40 million for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Unification Program (FUP), a national initiative to prevent family separation due to homelessness among foster care aging-out youth.
Had two anti-human trafficking bills signed into law:The Human Trafficking Accountability Act (P.L. 115-392) improved coordination on human trafficking within the Department of Justice.
Provision in the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act (P.L. 114-22) made it easier to report potential trafficking to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children CyberTipline.

X
Jim JordanJim Jordan

Current Position: US Representative for OH 4th District since 2007
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2001 – 2006; State Delegate from 1995 – 2000

Featured Quote: 
Discussing the January 6th Select Committee on Fox News with @seanhannity and @RepStefanik
at 9:00 p.m. ET / 8:00 p.m. CT. Tune in!

Featured Video: 
Rep. Jim Jordan says Trump is not to blame for Capitol insurrection

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) – One of the most conservative members of the U.S. House of Representatives is pointing to the University of Wisconsin – and, specifically, Camp Randall this weekend – as a sign that many Americans are ready to move on from COVID-19 safety protocols.

With video of the Badgers home rattling during ‘Jump Around’ ping-ponged across social media since Saturday, earning both praise and derision in many comment sections – Rep. Jim Jordan re-tweeted Barstool Sports video, adding the comment “Real America is done with #COVID-19. God bless!’

In less than two hours, the Republican congressmember’s tweet was retweeted nearly 1,000 times and picked up over 5,000 likes.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OH 4th District since 2007
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2001 – 2006; State Delegate from 1995 – 2000

Featured Quote: 
Discussing the January 6th Select Committee on Fox News with @seanhannity and @RepStefanik
at 9:00 p.m. ET / 8:00 p.m. CT. Tune in!

Featured Video: 
Rep. Jim Jordan says Trump is not to blame for Capitol insurrection

News

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) – One of the most conservative members of the U.S. House of Representatives is pointing to the University of Wisconsin – and, specifically, Camp Randall this weekend – as a sign that many Americans are ready to move on from COVID-19 safety protocols.

With video of the Badgers home rattling during ‘Jump Around’ ping-ponged across social media since Saturday, earning both praise and derision in many comment sections – Rep. Jim Jordan re-tweeted Barstool Sports video, adding the comment “Real America is done with #COVID-19. God bless!’

In less than two hours, the Republican congressmember’s tweet was retweeted nearly 1,000 times and picked up over 5,000 likes.

Twitter

About

Jim Jordan 1

Source: Government page

Jim Jordan was raised in Champaign County, Ohio, graduating from Graham High School in 1982, where he was a four-time state champion in wrestling with a career record of 150-1. He went on to earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from the University of Wisconsin, where he was a two-time NCAA wrestling champion. He later earned a Master’s degree in Education from the Ohio State University and a Law Degree from Capital University in Columbus, Ohio.

Jordan is a fiscal conservative who believes that families and taxpayers, rather than government, know best how to make decisions with their money. Throughout his career, Jim Jordan has led the fight against tax hikes, including those proposed by his own political party. He believes that cutting taxes and letting families keep more of what they earn helps build strong communities and a vibrant economy.

In Congress, Jordan has also emerged as a prominent defender of the taxpayer’s pocketbook through his work on spending issues. In 2009, he introduced the only balanced budget alternative to President Obama’s budget. In the 112th Congress, Jordan served as Chairman of the House Republican Study Committee, the largest caucus of conservatives, advancing conservative ideas and solutions on Capitol Hill. In the 114th Congress, Jordan helped found the House Freedom Caucus, and served as its first Chairman.

Jordan has been an advocate of the taxpayer, looking for waste, fraud and abuse in the federal government. He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Committee and on the House Oversight Committee.

As one of the most conservative members of Congress, his efforts have earned him recognition from Citizens against Government Waste, Family Research Council, Americans for Tax Reform’s Friend of the Taxpayer Award and the 2012 Weyrich Award for “National Legislator of the Year.”

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

Freedom Caucus
Congressional Constitution Caucus
Congressional Western Caucus
U.S.-Japan Caucus
Campus Free Speech Caucus

 

Experience

Work Experience

  • Member/ Representative
    Ohio House of Representatives
    1995 to 2000
  • Member/ Senator
    Ohio State Senate
    2001 to 2007

Education

Awards

Source

The American Conservative Union

– 100% Conservative Score on annual ACU Ratings of Congress: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 (longest running perfect record of any current Member of Congress)

– 2007 Best & Brightest Award

– 2008 Defender of Liberty Award

American Family Business Institute

– 2012 Champion of American Family Businesses Award

Americans for Tax Reform

– 2007 Hero of the Taxpayer Award

Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

– Champion of the Merit Shop: 110th & 111th Congress

Christian Coalition of Ohio

– 2004 Defender of Christian Values Award

Citizens for Community Values

– 2011 Ronald Reagan National Leadership Award

The Club For Growth

– Defender of Economic Freedom Award: 2008-2015 (Lifetime Rating of 98%)

Coalitions for America

– 2012 National Legislator of the Year

– Weyrich Award Dinner Keynote Speaker

The Coalition for Medicare Choices

– The Medicare Choices Leadership Award

Competitive Enterprise Institute & WorkplaceChoice.org

– 100% Pro-Worker voting score on the Workplace Choice Congressional Labor Scorecard: 2013, 2014

Family Research Council Action

– True Blue Award, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014

Farm Bureau

– Friend of Farm Bureau: 112th, 113th Congress

Freedom Works

– Freedom Fighter Award: 2012, 2013

Healthcare Leadership Council

– 2012 Champion of Healthcare Innovation Award

International Foodservice Distributors Association

– Thomas Jefferson Award: 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014

Jewish Vocational Service and Community Workshop

– Outstanding Service Award

National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies

– Benjamin Franklin Public Policy Award: 111th Congress

National Clergy Office

– 2008 Ten Commandments Project

National Federation of Independent Business

– Guardian of Small Business: 2005, 110th, 111th, 112th, 113th Congress

National Taxpayers Union

– Taxpayers’ Friend “A” Rating: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

National Tax Limitation Committee

– Tax Fighter Award: 110th, 111th, 112th

National Write Your Congressman

– 2008 Constituent Communication Award

Ohio Right to Life Society

– 1998 Defender of Life Award

Ohio State Senate

– 2006 Resolution for Outstanding Service

United Conservatives of Ohio

– Watch Dog of the Treasury: 1996, 2000, 2004, 2006

– 2004 Outstanding Legislator Award

– 1996 Outstanding Freshman Legislator Award

– 1998 Pro Life Award

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

– Spirit of Enterprise Award: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

U.S. English

– ‘A’ In English Award: 110th Congress & 111th Congress

60 Plus Association

– Guardian of Seniors’ Rights Award

TheTeaParty.net

– Paul Revere Patriot Award

Personal

Birth Year: 1964
Place of Birth: Troy, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian
Spouse: Polly Jordan
Children: Jessie Jordan, Isaac Jordan, Benjamin Jordan, Rachel Jordan

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2056 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2676
Fax: (202) 226-0577

Lima Office
3121 West Elm Plaza
Lima, OH 45805
Phone: (419) 999-6455
Fax: (419) 999-4238

Norwalk Office
13 B East Main Street
Norwalk, OH 44857
Phone: (419) 663-1426
Fax: (419) 668-3015

Bucyrus Office
500 South Sandusky Ave
Bucyrus, OH 44820
Phone: (419) 663-1426

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, Soundcloud, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

James Daniel Jordan (born February 17, 1964) is an American politician serving as the U.S. representative for Ohio’s 4th congressional district since 2007. His district stretches from Lake Erie to just below Urbana in north-central and western Ohio and includes Lima, Marion, Tiffin and Elyria. A member of the Republican Party, Jordan is a former collegiate wrestler and college wrestling coach.

Jordan is a founding member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, serving as its first chair from 2015 to 2017, and as its vice chair since 2017. He was the ranking member of the House Oversight Committee from 2019 to 2020. He vacated that position to become the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee.

Jordan is a close ally of former president Donald Trump. During Trump’s presidency, Jordan sought to discredit investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election and staged a sit-in to prevent a Trump impeachment inquiry hearing over the Trump-Ukraine scandal. After Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election and Trump refused to concede while making false claims of fraud, Jordan supported lawsuits to invalidate the election results and voted not to certify the Electoral College results. Trump awarded Jordan the Presidential Medal of Freedom on January 11, 2021.

Early life and education

Jordan was born and raised in Champaign County, Ohio, the son of Shirley and John Jordan.[3] He attended and wrestled for Graham High School, graduating in 1982. He won state championships all four years he was in high school and compiled a 156–1 win-loss record. He then enrolled at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he became a two-time NCAA Division I wrestling champion. Jordan won the 1985 and 1986 NCAA championship matches in the 134-pound (61 kg) weight class.[4][5] He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1986. He lost the 126–137-pound (57–62 kg) featherweight semifinal match at the 1988 US Olympic wrestling trials and failed to make the Olympic team.

Jordan earned a master’s degree in education from Ohio State University and a Juris Doctor from the Capital University Law School.[6] In a 2018 interview, Jordan said he never took the bar examination.[7]

Early career

Ohio State University abuse scandal

Jordan was an assistant wrestling coach with Ohio State University‘s wrestling program from 1987 to 1995.[8] Ohio State University began an independent investigation in April 2018[9] into allegations of sexual misconduct against former wrestling team physician Richard Strauss; Strauss was the team physician during Jordan’s tenure as assistant coach.[10][11] Strauss died by suicide in 2005.[12]

In June 2018, at least eight former wrestlers said that Jordan had been aware of, but did not respond to, allegations of sexual misconduct by Strauss.[13][14] Jordan’s locker was next to Strauss’s, and Jordan spent so much time in the locker room that he created and awarded a “King of the Sauna” certificate to the member of the team who spent the most time in the sauna “talking smack”.[15]

In July 2018, Jordan’s congressional spokesman Ian Fury released a statement in which Ohio State wrestling coach Russ Hellickson reportedly said: “At no time while Jim Jordan was a coach with me at Ohio State did either of us ignore abuse of our wrestlers. This is not the kind of man Jim is, and it is not the kind of coach that I was.”[16]

Former wrestling team members David Range,[14] Mike DiSabato and Dunyasha Yetts asserted that Jordan knew of Strauss’s misconduct. Yetts said, “For God’s sake, Strauss’s locker was right next to Jordan’s and Jordan even said he’d kill him if he tried anything with him”.[17] No wrestlers have accused Jordan of sexual misconduct, but four former wrestlers named him as a defendant in a lawsuit against the university.[18][19][20] Several former wrestlers, including ex-UFC fighter Mark Coleman, allege that Hellickson contacted two witnesses in an attempt to pressure them to support Jordan the day after they accused Jordan of turning a blind eye to the abuse.[21][22]

Jordan has refused to cooperate with investigations into Strauss.[23] He described his accusers as “pawns in a political plot”[24] and said he did not even hear any locker room talk about Strauss or sexual abuse at OSU.[25] In response to Jordan’s denials, DiSabato said, “I considered Jim Jordan a friend. But at the end of the day, he is absolutely lying if he says he doesn’t know what was going on.”[23][26]

On July 13, 2018, the editorial board of the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote, “Jim Jordan must acknowledge what he knew”.[27]

In May 2019, DiSabato filed a Title IX lawsuit against OSU. In one count of the court papers, DiSabato claimed that a second cousin of Jordan’s attempted to “intimidate and retaliate” against DiSabato.[28][29] In 2019, DiSabato shared text messages with NBC News, corroborated by another former wrestler,[30] indicating that Jordan, Russ Hellickson, and high school wrestling coach Jeff Jordan (Jim Jordan’s younger brother)[31] conspired to engage in witness tampering and intimidation when they called Coleman and Coleman’s parents to pressure Coleman to recant his accusation that Jordan was aware of the abuse.[30]

In November 2019, a retired wrestling referee filed a lawsuit alleging that he had warned Jordan and Hellickson about Strauss’s misconduct but they had dismissed his warning.[32][33][34] Jordan said that the referee was “another person making a false statement”.[35]

In February 2020, Adam DiSabato, the brother of Mike DiSabato, testified before the Ohio House Civil Justice Committee that Jordan called him “crying, groveling… begging me to go against my brother” and described Jordan as a “coward”.[26][36][37]

Ohio General Assembly

Jordan was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives in November 1994 and represented the 85th Ohio House district for three terms.

In 2000, Jordan was elected to the Ohio Senate over independent candidate Jack Kaffenberger with 88% of the vote. In 2004, Jordan defeated Kaffenberger again, with 79% of the vote.

U.S. House of Representatives

Jim Jordan with Vice President Mike Pence

Elections

Jordan represents Ohio’s 4th congressional district. He won the Republican primary for the 4th district in 2006 after 26-year incumbent Mike Oxley announced his retirement. Jordan defeated Democratic nominee Rick Siferd in the general election with 60% of the vote.[38]

Jordan was reelected in 2008, defeating Democratic nominee Mike Carroll with 65% of the vote.[39] In 2010, he was again reelected, defeating Democrat Doug Litt and Libertarian Donald Kissick with 71% of the vote.[38] Jordan was reelected in 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020.[40]

Tenure

Jordan chaired the Republican Study Committee[41] during the 112th Congress[42] while turning down a position on the Appropriations Committee.[43] During the U.S. government shutdown of 2013, he was considered[by whom?] the committee’s most powerful member.[44] That group was the primary proponent and executor of the Republican Congressional strategy to force a government shutdown, in order to force changes in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.[44]

Jordan received a vote for Speaker of the United States House of Representatives in the 113th Congress from a fellow right-wing conservative, Tea Party Caucus chairman Tim Huelskamp of Kansas. Jordan received two votes for Speaker during the 114th Congress.[45] On July 26, 2018, Jordan announced his bid for Speaker after Paul Ryan resigned,[46] but he lost to Kevin McCarthy.[47] His campaign ended when Democrats took the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives.[46] Subsequently, Jordan campaigned for House minority leader. Former Ohio state representative Capri Cafar said that Jordan “is someone who has built a reputation as an attack dog, someone who is media savvy, someone who is a stalwart supporter of the president and who has the skill necessary to take the lead for the GOP”.[48] He lost his bid to McCarthy in a 159–43 vote.[49]

Jordan was the ranking member of the House Oversight Committee from 2019 to 2020. In February 2020, he left his position on the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and replaced Doug Collins on the United States House Committee on the Judiciary. Collins was required to step down from the committee post after launching his bid in the 2020–21 United States Senate special election in Georgia. Jordan was replaced on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform by Mark Meadows.[50][51]

Jordan’s district has been redrawn over time to minimize urban area and increase rural area; it is now gerrymandered to avoid containing Toledo, Columbus or Cleveland (or their respective suburbs); it stretches from Lake Erie nearly to Dayton. A three-judge federal panel unanimously ruled in May 2019 that Ohio’s congressional district map is unconstitutional due to partisan gerrymandering and ordered Ohio to create a new map in time for the 2020 election. But after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Rucho v. Common Cause that courts could not review allegations of gerrymandering, the district boundaries will not change until congressional district maps are redrawn in 2022.[52]

Freedom Caucus

During the 114th Congress, Jordan and eight other members of Congress founded the House Freedom Caucus, a bloc of conservatives working “to advance an agenda of limited constitutional government” in Congress.[53] He served as the group’s first chair.[54] The caucus was ultimately credited with pushing Speaker John Boehner into retirement.[48]

Legislation

On May 2, 2014, Jordan introduced House Resolution 565, “Calling on Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., to appoint a special counsel to investigate the targeting of conservative nonprofit groups by the Internal Revenue Service”. It passed on May 7, 2014.[55]

In March 2017, Jordan criticized the newly introduced American Health Care Act, the Republican replacement bill for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, calling it an unacceptable form of “Obamacare Lite”.[56] On May 4, 2017, he voted to pass a revised version of the legislation.[57][58]

On June 13, 2018, Jordan and Representative Mark Meadows filed a resolution to compel the Department of Justice to provide certain documents to Congress relating to the ongoing congressional investigations of Russian interference in the 2016 election. The resolution asserted that the DOJ was stonewalling congressional oversight and sought to give the DOJ seven days from its enactment to turn over documents related to both Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein‘s appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller as well as various decisions made by the FBI during the 2016 presidential election. Jordan issued a press release that stated:

This resolution gives the DOJ seven days to turn over the documents that they owe Congress. Rod Rosenstein threatened congressional staff. When the bully picks on your little brother, you have to respond. It’s time for House Leadership to stand up and pass this resolution.[59]

On July 25, 2018, Jordan and Meadows introduced articles of impeachment against Rosenstein, whom they accused of “intentionally withholding embarrassing documents and information, knowingly hiding material investigative information from Congress, various abuses of the FISA process, and failure to comply with congressional subpoenas”. Jordan stated that impeachment was necessary because:

The DOJ is keeping information from Congress. Enough is enough. It’s time to hold Mr. Rosenstein accountable for blocking Congress’s constitutional oversight role.[60][61]

Jordan and Representative Warren Davidson were the only members of Ohio’s congressional delegation and two of 60 members of Congress to vote in October 2019 against a bipartisan resolution that passed the House 354–60 condemning President Donald Trump’s unilateral withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Syria.[62][63][64]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Jordan speaking at the 2016 Conservative Political Action Conference.

According to The Dayton Daily News, Jordan “is known for being one of Congress’ most conservative members”.[71]

Jordan has earned a perfect score from the American Conservative Union.[72] He has voted consistently for anti-abortion legislation and was endorsed by Ohio Right to Life in 2012.[73] During the 112th Congress, he was one of 40 “staunch” members of the Republican Study Committee who frequently voted against Republican party leadership and vocally expressed displeasure with House bills.[74]

Jordan was a leading critic of President Barack Obama‘s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) program, advocating for its shutdown.[75]

Jordan has supported the continued production and upgrades of M1 Abrams tanks in his district.[76]

Jordan, along with all other Senate and House Republicans, voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[77]

Donald Trump

Jordan has been a stalwart supporter[78] and close ally of Trump.[79] Asked by Anderson Cooper in April 2018 whether he had ever heard Trump tell a lie, Jordan said “I have not” and “nothing comes to mind”.[80] He also said, “I don’t know that [Trump has ever] said something wrong that he needs to apologize for.”[81]

In December 2017, Jordan sought to discredit the FBI and Special Counsel Robert Mueller‘s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.[82] Jordan questioned Mueller’s impartiality, and called on Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to use his authority to disband the Mueller investigation or create a second special counsel to simultaneously investigate Mueller himself.[82] Rosenstein rejected the request, saying that he could not appoint another special counsel as there was no credible allegation of a potential crime.[82] The New York Times reported that Republicans were increasingly criticizing Mueller’s investigation after it “delivered a series of indictments to high-profile associates of the president and evidence that at least two of them are cooperating with the inquiry”.[82] In July 2018, Jordan led efforts to impeach Rosenstein as a way to shut down the special counsel’s investigation.[83] During a hearing on July 12, 2018, Jordan repeatedly interrupted FBI agent Peter Strzok while Strzok tried to explain that he couldn’t answer specific questions to preserve the confidentiality of an ongoing investigation. Jordan’s behavior caused committee Democrats to protest his tactics and to allow Strzok to respond. They also objected to Jordan’s exceeding his allowed time for questioning. House Judiciary Committee chairman Bob Goodlatte admonished Jordan for his repeated interruptions of the witness.[84]

In July 2018, Jordan and Mark Meadows called on the Department of Justice to “review allegations that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein threatened to subpoena phone records and documents from a House Intelligence Committee staffer”. In their written request, the two wrote that in his use of investigative powers, Rosenstein had retaliated “against rank-and-file (congressional) staff members”, thereby abusing his authority.[85] Talking to John Catsimatidis on WNYM, Jordan said he would force a vote on Rosenstein’s impeachment if the DOJ did not deliver documents Congress requested.[86]

In March 2019, House Judiciary chair Jerrold Nadler criticized Jordan for allegedly using anti-Semitic messaging by spelling 2020 presidential candidate Tom Steyer‘s name with a “$” in place of an “S” on Twitter[87] while urging Nadler to resist calls for Trump’s impeachment.[88][89]

During Mueller’s testimony to two congressional committees on July 24, 2019, Jordan asked Mueller why he never charged Joseph Mifsud with lying to the FBI while George Papadopoulos was charged for lying about Mifsud. Jordan said: “Mifsud is the guy who told Papadopoulos [about Russian dirt]. He was the guy who started it all. Yet when the FBI interviews him, he lies three times; you don’t charge him.” Mueller responded, “Well, I can’t get into it and it’s obvious, I think, that we can’t get into charging decisions.”[90]

On October 23, 2019, Jordan and two dozen other Republicans staged a protest that delayed a Trump impeachment inquiry hearing. The coordinated action disrupted the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence where Republican and Democratic congressional members planned to take testimony from Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper.[91] The group staged a sit-in outside the Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) hearing room.[92][93] Some of the Republicans who participated already had access to the hearings since the members of the House Oversight, Intelligence and Foreign Affairs committees were welcome to attend and ask questions.[94]

Describing the sit-in, Jordan said, “The members have just had it, and they want to be able to see and represent their constituents and find out what’s going on.”[93] The next day, he said on Fox News, “Adam Schiff is doing this unfair, partisan process in secret and our members finally said, ‘Enough’…We’re so frustrated. They reached a boiling point and these guys marched in and said ‘we want to know what’s going on.’”[95]

House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson wrote to the House sergeant-at-arms about Jordan, Representative Bradley Byrne, and others, requesting that he take action regarding their “unprecedented breach of security”. Senator Lindsey Graham admonished his House colleagues for their tactic, calling them “nuts” for having made a “run on the SCIF”.[95][93][96][97]

As the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, during a July 2020 hearing with attorney general Bill Barr, Jordan presented a video montage that took statements by CNN reporters out of context to create a false impression they were characterizing violent protests as peaceful.[98]

In December 2020, Jordan was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[99] Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[100][101][102]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion”. She reprimanded Jordan and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[103][104] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Jordan and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit, arguing that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[105]

On January 6-7, 2021, Jordan cast a vote to prevent the certification of the Electoral College in at least one state.[106] He was one of the 139 representatives who voted to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election in Congress on January 7, 2021, the day after the storming of the Capitol.[107] At a later virtual committee meeting, Jordan said the storming of the United States Capitol “was as wrong as wrong can be”.[108]

On January 11, 2021, Trump awarded Jordan the Presidential Medal of Freedom[109][1][2] in a closed-door ceremony.[110]

Environment

In July 2008, Jordan was the first member of Congress to sign the “No Climate Tax” pledge drafted by the conservative political advocacy group Americans for Prosperity.[111]

In Congress, Jordan voted to open the Outer Continental Shelf to oil drilling, prevent the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases, and bar greenhouse gases from Clean Air Act rules. He voted against enforcing limits on carbon dioxide global warming pollution, tax credits for renewable electricity, tax incentives for renewable energy and energy conservation, and curtailing subsidies for oil and gas company exploration.[112]

Abortion

Jordan opposes abortion.[113] He opposes federal funding to Planned Parenthood.[114]

Taxes

While serving in the Ohio Senate, Jordan supported the Tax and Expenditure Limitation Amendment, a state constitutional amendment that would require a vote of the people to raise taxes or increase spending over certain limits.[115]

Foreign policy

Jordan was among 60 Republicans to oppose condemning Trump’s action of withdrawing forces from Syria.[116] Along with Matt Gaetz and a handful of Republicans, he broke with the party and voted to end Saudi assistance to the war in Yemen.[117]

In June 2021, Jordan was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the AUMF against Iraq.[118][119]

Personal life

Jordan and his wife, Polly, live near Urbana in central Champaign County. They were introduced by her brothers, with whom Jordan competed in wrestling.[120] Polly and Jordan started dating when he was 13 and she was 14. They have four children and two grandchildren.[121] Jordan’s son-in-law, Jarrod Uthoff, is a professional basketball player.[122]

Political campaigns

U.S. House of Representatives, Ohio 4th District

2008 – defeated Mike Carroll.

2010 – defeated Doug Litt (D) and Donald Kissick (L).

2012 – defeated Jim Slone (D) and Chris Kalla (L).

2014 – defeated Janet Garrett (D).

2016 – defeated Janet Garrett (D).

2018 – defeated Janet Garrett (D).

2020 – defeated Shannon Freshour (D) and Steve Perkins (L).

Electoral history

Election results of Jim Jordan[123]
YearOfficeElectionPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%
1998Ohio House of RepresentativesGeneralR23,76368.36%Robert BurnsD10,99931.64%
2000Ohio SenateGeneralR99,80376.94%Jack Kaffenberger Sr.I15,54511.98%Debra MitchellNL14,37311.08%
2004Ohio SenateGeneralR118,19379.27%Jack Kaffenberger Sr.I30,90220.73%
2006U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR129,95859.99%Richard E. SiferdD86,67840.01%
2008U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR186,15465.17%Mike CarrollD99,49934.83%
2010U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR146,02971.49%Doug LittD50,53324.74%Donald KissickL7,7083.77%
2012U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR182,64358.35%Jim SloneD114,21436.49%Chris KallaL16,1415.16%
2014U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR125,90767.67%Janet GarrettD60,16532.33%
2016U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR210,22767.99%Janet GarrettD98,98132.01%
2018U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR164,64065.41%Janet GarrettD87,06134.59%
2020U.S. House of RepresentativesGeneralR235,87567.85%Shannon FreshourD101,89729.31%Steve PerkinsL9,8542.83%

See also

References

  1. ^ a b “President Donald J. Trump to Award the Medal of Freedom to Jim Jordan”. whitehouse.gov. January 11, 2021. Archived from the original on January 20, 2021. Retrieved May 27, 2021 – via National Archives.
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