Mike DeWineMike DeWine – OH

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2022 Governor
Former Positions: Attorney General from 2011 – 2019; US Senator from 1995 – 2007; US Representative from 1983 – 1991

OnAir Post: Mike DeWine – OH

Ohio leaders push to make it harder for poor to get health coverage
Ohio Capital Journal, MARTY SCHLADEN September 10, 2021

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has cast a skeptical eye on regulations for a group the state refers to as “job creators.” But he and Attorney General Dave Yost are pushing for regulations that will make it more difficult for the poor — including those with jobs — to get health care.

DeWine on Thursday announced that he was calling on Yost to sue to overturn President Joe Biden’s decision to invalidate Medicaid work requirements. Former President Donald Trump approved the Ohio work requirement in 2019.

In the Buckeye State, Medicaid covers 25% of the population, so the requirement would affect many.

“Removing a provision that says a healthy, able-bodied individual should be working, looking for work, participating in job training, or participating in a recovery program in order to receive free taxpayer-funded health care is contrary to Ohioans’ values,” DeWine said in a statement that was issued under his and Yost’s names

Gov. Mike DeWine on masking in schools
NBC4 ColumbusJuly 26, 2021 (10:16)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4G3Y6kvBws

Governor says he no longer has the authority to mandate mask-wearing but notes it was very effective last year.

Summary

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2022 Governor
Former Positions: Attorney General from 2011 – 2019; US Senator from 1995 – 2007; US Representative from 1983 – 1991

OnAir Post: Mike DeWine – OH

News

Ohio leaders push to make it harder for poor to get health coverage
Ohio Capital Journal, MARTY SCHLADEN September 10, 2021

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has cast a skeptical eye on regulations for a group the state refers to as “job creators.” But he and Attorney General Dave Yost are pushing for regulations that will make it more difficult for the poor — including those with jobs — to get health care.

DeWine on Thursday announced that he was calling on Yost to sue to overturn President Joe Biden’s decision to invalidate Medicaid work requirements. Former President Donald Trump approved the Ohio work requirement in 2019.

In the Buckeye State, Medicaid covers 25% of the population, so the requirement would affect many.

“Removing a provision that says a healthy, able-bodied individual should be working, looking for work, participating in job training, or participating in a recovery program in order to receive free taxpayer-funded health care is contrary to Ohioans’ values,” DeWine said in a statement that was issued under his and Yost’s names

Gov. Mike DeWine on masking in schools
NBC4 ColumbusJuly 26, 2021 (10:16)

Governor says he no longer has the authority to mandate mask-wearing but notes it was very effective last year.

Twitter

About

Mike DeWine 2

Source: Government page

Mike DeWine’s story is a true Ohio story. Raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Mike DeWine and Fran (Struewing) met in the first grade and married while students at Miami University. They’ve been blessed with eight children and 24 grandchildren. Family is at the core of everything Mike DeWine does, and that’s why he has devoted his life to fighting for Ohio’s families. He knows when families are strong, Ohio communities are stronger, and our future is bright.

Vision for the Future

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He will fight for an Ohio that works for everyone – every person and every family in every corner of our state. From world class cities to some of the best small towns in America, Mike DeWine knows that to build our state into an economic powerhouse, we must have strong schools, a great quality of life, and compassion for those who need our help.

Ohio Values

Mike DeWine’s family started a seed company in Yellow Springs. Working alongside his parents and grandparents, Mike learned early the value of hard work, strong leadership, and fiscal responsibility.

Growing up, he loaded seed bags onto trucks and boxcars, shoveled wheat out of trucks during harvest, worked in wheat fields to help ensure the purity of the seed, and basically did whatever it took to get the job done for their customers. Inseparable to the end, his parents were married for 65 years and died within four days of each other. The values he learned from them still live within him today.

A Lifetime of Service

On November 6, 2018, Mike DeWine was elected to serve as the 70th Governor of the State of Ohio. The Governor has had a long and distinguished career in public service, focusing on protecting Ohio children and families. He was previously the 50th Attorney General of Ohio and has previously been elected to serve as Greene County Prosecutor, Ohio State Senator, U.S. Congressman, Ohio Lt. Governor, U.S. Senator.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Experience

Work Experience

  • U.S. representative
    1983 to 1991
  • Lieutenant governor
    1991 to 1994
  • U.S. senator
    1995 to 2007

Education

  • B.A.
    Miami University
    1969
  • J.D.
    Ohio Northern University
    1972

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Springfield, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian: Catholic
Spouse: Frances Struewing
Children: Pat DeWine, Alice DeWine, Mark DeWine, Rebecca DeWine, Anna DeWine, Jill DeWine, Brian DeWine, John DeWine

Contact

Email:

Offices

Governors Office
Riffe Center, 30th floor, 77th South High Street, Columbus, OH 43215

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia

Politics

Recent Elections

2018 Governor

Richard Michael DeWine (R)2,231,91750.4%
Richard Cordray (D)2,067,84746.7%
Travis Irvine (L)79,9851.8%
Constance Gadell-Newton (G)49,4751.1%
TOTAL4,429,224

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

DEWINE, MIKE has run in 3 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $40,669,526.

Source: Follow the Money

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Source: Campaign page

Results for Ohioans
Mike DeWine is fighting every day to create jobs and a thriving economy that help all Ohioans get ahead.

Economy & Jobs

Winning historic investment for Ohio
Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted won the historic $20 billion Intel Semiconductor Factory project, which will bring more than 20,000 good-paying jobs to the buckeye state and will create generational opportunities for Ohioans. This is a powerful development not only for Ohio’s economy and jobs, but for U.S. national security.

Ohio is on the front lines of the U.S.-China tech fight. China is doing everything it can to take over the global market so they can try to outcompete America. This starts with microchips that power everything from phones to cars, to home appliances, computers and much more.

Gov. DeWine took historic action to bring manufacturing back to America and home to Ohio. The Intel mega-project will be the largest single private sector company investment in Ohio’s history.

Governor DeWine will continue to fight for smart pro-business policies and win for Ohio workers against Communist China.

Enacting the largest tax cut in history…
Since Mike DeWine began his first term as Governor in 2019, he’s already cut taxes for all Ohioans by $2.2 billion dollars — which adds up to one of the largest tax cuts in Ohio history! In fact, Ohio was one of only nine states in the country that trimmed its tax burden during the coronavirus pandemic, thanks to strong fiscal leadership.

When the virus disrupted the global economy in 2020, Governor DeWine also tightened Ohio’s budget by cutting $750 million in government spending. Knowing that businesses and restaurants were most impacted by COVID, his Administration returned over $9 billion to small businesses through Bureau of Workers Compensation rebates to help them stay afloat and protect worker’s paychecks.

It paid off. In August 2020, Fitch Ratings elevated Ohio’s financial outlook from “stable” to a “positive” AA+ rating, citing the state’s superior financial resilience. The upgrade is Ohio’s first change in 11 years, and represents the highest Ohio rating since 1979.

Creating jobs in Ohio…
Governor DeWine is bringing manufacturing jobs back to Ohio. The DeWine-Husted administration has championed career, technical and vocational education and training to help thousands of Ohioans prepare for good paying jobs and get ahead in their career.

A pro-business environment plus a strong workforce equals business investment. General Motors and LG Chem dedicated $2.3 billion to the Mahoning Valley to make battery cells for electric vehicles, which will create 1,100 jobs. Governor DeWine recently visited Toledo to celebrate Cleveland Cliff’s $1 billion investment to build and operate the world’s most modern and environmentally friendly Direct Reduction plan, which has created hundreds of jobs already.

The world is taking notice. Site Selection magazine ranked Ohio as the number one state for new business investment per capita, and CEO Magazine recently moved Ohio from 9th to the 7th best state to do business.

Building a Modern Workforce to Compete with China
To compete with China and succeed in a tech-focused economy, Governor DeWine and Lieutenant Governor Husted are investing substantially in career education, job training, and workforce development.  They are closing the digital divide so all Ohioans have access to high-speed Internet services, which will create opportunity for generations.

The DeWine-Husted Administration has funded more than 40,000 tech-focused credentials through the TechCred and IMAP programs, through which Ohioans can earn short-term credentials — at no cost — to unlock new career possibilities and rewarding, good-paying job opportunities.  Also, Governor DeWine is advancing Ohio’s apprenticeship programs to give Ohioans clear paths into high-pay, high-skill careers.  Over 19,000 Ohioans are currently in an apprenticeship, and Ohio is #1 in the Midwest and #3 nationally for the number of apprentices.

By creating Broadband Ohio, Governor DeWine is greatly expanding affordable, high-speed Internet availability across Ohio.  With an investment of $232 million in grants, Broadband Ohio estimates that around 230,000 residents will gain access to high-speed internet.  Giving our rural and underserved areas access will be a boon not only for local economies, but also for children and students.

Criminal Justice

Fighting crime…
Mike DeWine has spent his career supporting the needs of local law enforcement. When he served as Ohio Attorney General, he led the charge to close pill mills across the state.  Under his leadership, Ohio was one of the first states in the country to file major litigation against drug manufacturers and distributors for their role in fueling the opioid epidemic.  As a result, every community in Ohio will receive critical funds that will help save lives through evidence-based treatment, support for people in recovery, and prevention education.

Governor DeWine knows that to protect our communities and families, we must secure our southern border.  He authorized sending the Ohio National Guard and Ohio Highway Patrol to the border to help stop lethal drugs, such as fentanyl, from reaching Ohio communities.

Further, Governor DeWine has championed our law enforcement officers across the state.  While some politicians have called for defunding the police, Governor DeWine has doubled down on his support — investing more than $274 million to give our brave men and women in uniform the resources they need to keep Ohio communities safe by reducing violent crime, decreasing substance abuse, and assisting local agencies in the recruitment and hiring of new officers.

See Also

Google Search

Mike DeWine politician

More Web Links

Vote Smart

Ballotpedia

Wikipedia

Richard Michael DeWine (/dəˈwn/; born January 5, 1947) is an American politician and attorney serving as the 70th and current governor of Ohio. A member of the Republican Party, DeWine began his career as a prosecutor before being elected to the Ohio Senate. He served as a U.S. representative from 1983 until 1991, 59th lieutenant governor of Ohio under George Voinovich from 1991 until 1994, United States senator from 1995 to 2007, and the 50th attorney general of Ohio from 2011 to 2019.

Early life and education

DeWine and his family with President Ronald Reagan in 1985

DeWine was born and raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio. He is the son of Jean Ruth (Liddle) and Richard Lee DeWine.[3][4][5] Of Irish descent, he was raised and identifies as a Roman Catholic.[6][7][8] DeWine earned his Bachelor of Science degree in education from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in 1969 and a Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University College of Law in 1972.

Early political career

DeWine with President George H. W. Bush in 1990

At age 25, DeWine started working as an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney for Greene County, Ohio, and in 1976 was elected County Prosecutor, serving for four years.[9][10] In 1980 he was elected to the Ohio State Senate and served one two-year term.[10]

Two years later, U.S. Representative Bud Brown of Ohio’s 7th congressional district retired after 18 years in Congress; his father, Clarence Brown, Sr., had held the seat for 26 years before that. DeWine won the Republican nomination, assuring him of election in November. He was reelected three more times from this district, which stretches from his home in Springfield to the Columbus suburbs. He ran unopposed in 1986 in what was regarded as a bad year for Republicans nationally. DeWine gave up his seat in 1990 to run for lieutenant governor of Ohio as George Voinovich‘s running mate. The Voinovich-DeWine ticket was easily elected.

In 1992, DeWine unsuccessfully ran for United States Senate against the former astronaut and incumbent Senator John Glenn. His campaign used the phrase, “What on earth has John Glenn done?” echoing Jeff Bingaman‘s slogan, ‘What on Earth has he done for you lately?’” against former astronaut Harrison Schmitt in their 1982 Senate race.[11][12]

U.S. Senate

DeWine in 1997

In 1994, DeWine ran again for Senate, defeating prominent attorney Joel Hyatt (the son-in-law of retiring Senator Howard Metzenbaum) by a 14-point margin. DeWine was reelected in 2000, defeating gunshow promoter Ronald Dickson (161,185 votes, or 12.44%) and former U.S. Rep. Frank Cremeans (104,219 votes, or 8.05%) in the primary and Ted Celeste (brother of former Ohio governor Dick Celeste) in the general election. DeWine sat on the Senate Judiciary and Select Intelligence committees. He was the initial sponsor of the Drug-Free Century Act in 1999.[13] He voted in favor of the 2002 Iraq Resolution authorizing the use of force against Saddam Hussein.[14]

In the 2006 United States Senate election in Ohio, DeWine ran for reelection but lost to U.S. Representative and former Ohio Secretary of State Sherrod Brown by double digits.[15] He received 905,644 fewer votes in 2006 than he received in 2000.[16][17][18]

Post-Senate career

DeWine accepted positions teaching government courses at Cedarville University, Ohio Northern University and Miami University. In 2007, he joined the law firm Keating Muething & Klekamp as corporate investigations group co-chair.[19] He also advised the Ohio campaign of John McCain’s 2008 presidential bid.[20]

Attorney General of Ohio

AG photo

On July 21, 2009, DeWine announced candidacy for attorney general of the State of Ohio.[21] On November 2, 2010, he was elected attorney general, defeating incumbent Richard Cordray, 48–46%.[22] As attorney general of Ohio, DeWine sent letters to drugstore chains encouraging them to discontinue the sale of tobacco products.[23]

In the 2012 Republican presidential primary, DeWine endorsed Tim Pawlenty, then endorsed Mitt Romney after Pawlenty dropped out of the race. On February 17, 2012, DeWine announced he was retracting his endorsement of Romney and endorsed Rick Santorum. DeWine said, “To be elected president, you have to do more than tear down your opponents. You have to give the American people a reason to vote for you, a reason to hope, a reason to believe that under your leadership, America will be better. Rick Santorum has done that. Sadly, Governor Romney has not.”[24]

On November 4, 2014, DeWine was reelected as attorney general, defeating challenger David A. Pepper.[25] He carried 83 of Ohio’s 88 counties.[26]

Legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act

In 2015, DeWine filed a lawsuit in federal court in Ohio against a part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).[27][28] In the suit, he alleged that the ACA’s Transitional Reinsurance Program (which imposed a fee “paid by all employers who provide group health insurance in the workplace”, which in 2014 was $63 per covered person and in 2015 was $44 per covered person) was unconstitutional as applied to state and local governments.[29] When he filed the suit, DeWine claimed that the fee was “an unprecedented attempt to destroy the balance of authority between the federal government and the states”.[29]

In January 2016, the federal court dismissed DeWine’s suit, with U.S. District Judge Algenon L. Marbley holding that the Transitional Reinsurance Program did not violate the Constitution.[29] DeWine appealed, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit affirmed Marbley’s dismissal of the suit.[30]

Criminal justice

DeWine’s stated goal has been “Protecting Ohio Families”.[31] To that effect, he made it a priority to significantly reduce DNA testing turnaround times in connection with open criminal investigations. Under his predecessor, DNA testing at the Ohio Attorney General’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) took approximately four months in cases such as murders, rapes, and assaults. Under the DeWine administration, DNA test results are now returned to local law enforcement in less than a month, leading to faster apprehension of dangerous suspects.[32]

Upon taking office in 2011, DeWine launched a special sexual assault kit (SAK) testing initiative after learning that hundreds of police departments across Ohio had thousands of untested rape kits on their evidence room shelves. DeWine invested resources to test the 13,931 previously untested rape kits over the course of his administration, which led to more than 5,000 DNA hits in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS).[33] These DNA matches led to the indictments of approximately 700 alleged rapists, many of whom were serial attackers, connected to cases that would never have been solved if not for the DeWine initiative.[34]

DeWine also launched the Crimes Against Children Initiative, which paired BCI criminal investigators with seasoned prosecuting attorneys to investigate and prosecute child predators. The Crimes Against Children Initiative focuses on holding accountable those who sexually and physically abuse children, those who share and view child pornography, and those who target children online.[35] DeWine’s office also developed several task forces for the investigation and prosecutions of human trafficking throughout the state.[36]

Opioids

As attorney general, DeWine took steps to close down “pill mills” in Ohio that fueled the opioid epidemic. By the end of his first year in office, he had worked to close all 12 pill mills in Scioto County, considered by many to have been the national center of the prescription drug crisis.[37][38] DeWine’s efforts also led to more than 100 doctors and pharmacists losing their licenses for improper prescription practices.[39] In 2013, DeWine formed a new Heroin Unit to provide Ohio communities with law enforcement, legal, and outreach assistance to combat the state’s heroin problem. The Heroin Unit draws from new and existing office resources, including BCI investigative and laboratory services, Ohio Organized Crime Investigations Commission assistance, prosecutorial support, and outreach and education services.[40] In October 2017, DeWine announced a 12-pronged plan to combat the opioid epidemic, drawing from his experience breaking up pill mills, prosecuting traffickers, supporting recovery, and advocating the importance of drug-use prevention education.[41] In addition, he went after the pharmaceutical industry, suing opioid manufacturers and distributors for their alleged roles in fraudulent marketing and unsafe distribution of opioids that fueled the epidemic in Ohio and across the country.[42][43]

Columbus Crew relocation lawsuit

In October 2017, news reports surfaced that Anthony Precourt, the investor-operator of the soccer club Columbus Crew, was exploring the option of moving the team out of state.[44] After the Cleveland Browns moved to Baltimore in the late 1990s, the Ohio General Assembly passed a law requiring professional sports teams that had accepted taxpayer assistance to provide an opportunity for local owners to purchase the team before initiating a move.[45] In December 2017, DeWine sent a letter to Precourt reminding him of his obligations under Ohio law.[46] After Precourt failed to respond, DeWine filed suit against Precourt and Major League Soccer in March 2018 to enforce Ohio law and insist upon a reasonable opportunity for local investors to buy the team.[47] As the lawsuit played out, an investor group including Dee and Jimmy Haslam, owners of the Cleveland Browns, and the Columbus-based Edwards family announced in October 2018 they were working out the details of a deal to keep the Browns in Columbus.[48]

Governor of Ohio

2018 election

DeWine delivers remarks at the Department of Justice in 2018.

DeWine greeting President Donald Trump in 2019

On May 26, 2016, DeWine announced his candidacy for governor of Ohio in 2018.[49] He confirmed this on June 25, 2017, at the annual ice cream social held at his home in Cedarville, Ohio. On December 1, 2017, DeWine chose Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted as his running mate. On May 8, 2018, he won the Republican primary, defeating incumbent Lieutenant Governor Mary Taylor with 59.8% of the vote. He defeated the Democratic nominee, former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray in the general election, by a margin of about four percentage points.[50]

Tenure

2019

On February 22, 2019, President Trump appointed DeWine to the bipartisan Council of Governors.[51]

On August 4, 2019, a mass shooting occurred in Dayton, Ohio, that killed ten people and injured 27 others; this followed a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas by just 13 hours.[52] At a vigil for the victims of the Dayton shooting the next day, DeWine was drowned out by a crowd chanting “Do something!”; the chant referred to the lack of legislative gun control actions on the state and federal level.[52] On August 6, DeWine proposed to allow judges to confiscate firearms from those deemed potentially dangerous and to provide them with mental health treatment while maintaining their due process rights.[53][54][55] Other notable aspects of DeWine’s plan include expanded background checks before purchasing a firearm, increased access to psychiatric and behavioral health services, and increased penalties for illegally possessing firearms.[53][54][55]

In October 2019, DeWine held the first meeting of a Lead Advisory Committee he appointed for the state.[56] The committee is meant to advise him on the state’s lead remediation efforts.[57] In December 2019, he expressed his support for Ohio allowing cities to ban plastic bags, opposing two bills in the state legislature that would have forbidden it[58] being pushed by fellow Republicans.[59]

On December 10, 2019, during the Ohio Contractors Association’s winter conference in Columbus, DeWine said that he wanted to improve the Interstate rest areas in Ohio by adding more information about Ohio’s history and culture. He also said, “I’m told that our rest areas are sorry.”[60] In late December, DeWine announced that Ohio would continue to accept refugees. In a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, he wrote, “Before entering the United States, there is a lengthy, complex, and careful vetting process done by multiple federal agencies to confirm a refugee’s eligibility for entrance.”[61]

2020

In January 2020, DeWine sent troops from the Ohio National Guard to Puerto Rico, which had recently experienced several earthquakes.[62] On January 15, he signed a $30 million funding bill for Ohio farmers to prevent algal blooms, which went into effect on February 1.[63] On January 27, DeWine signed Senate Bill 7, which gives military members and their spouses better employment opportunities by simplifying the process to transfer their occupational licenses to Ohio.[64] In February 2020, he announced new distracted driving legislation he was sponsoring.[65] Also in February 2020, he attracted attention for declining to share his opinion about Ohio’s death penalty, at the time having “frozen all Ohio executions indefinitely as the state struggles to find lethal-injection drugs”.[66]

Informed of the public risk by Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, on March 3, DeWine canceled most of the Arnold Sports Festival due to the imminent threat of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ohio, before any cases or deaths were reported. The cancellation was widely regarded as “radical” at the time[67][68] but was soon seen as less so, with Axios calling DeWine “among the leading governors in the country sounding the alarm about the threat of the coronavirus”[69] and The Washington Post calling his and Acton’s response “a national guide to the crisis” and “textbook recommendations”,[70] pointing out numerous occasions when moves Ohio made were soon duplicated by other states.[71] The Hill said DeWine had “been one of the most aggressive governors in responding to the pandemic”.[72] He has supported funding for COVID-19, signing his support of a funding bill along with 37 other governors in March 2020.[73] On March 11, 2020, DeWine issued an order limiting visitors to Ohio assisted living facilities and nursing homes, limiting visitors to one per day per resident, with all visitors to be screened for illness.[74] Also on March 11, he announced he was drafting legislation to limit mass gatherings in the state.[75] DeWine barred spectators from sporting events; was first in the U.S. to shut down schools throughout his state; and, on the night before it was to take place, postponed Ohio’s primary election.[76] He directed the Ohio Department of Health to order the closing of the state’s more than 22,000 food service locations and bars, except for carry-out. This was one of the earliest state closures of restaurants in response to the pandemic and drew disapproval from many high-level state Republicans.[77] On April 1, the BBC called DeWine “quick to defer to Dr Acton for specific questions on the virus and its spread” during daily news briefings, “reminding Ohioans that the state’s decisions are driven by science”.[67]

2022

During the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, DeWine voiced support for Ukraine, saying that the invasion was “unacceptable, and all freedom-loving people should stand against this unprovoked invasion”.[78] On February 26, he took action in support of Ukraine by banning the purchase and sale of Russian Standard (vodka) within the state of Ohio because the brand and distilleries are owned by a Russian corporation. Retailers were asked to “immediately pull Green Mark Vodka” (an alternate variety of Russian Standard) “and Russian Standard Vodka from their shelves”.[79] On the same day, DeWine declared February 27, 2022, a “Day of Prayer for the People of Ukraine”.[80] On March 8, he directed the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services to convene with resettlement agencies, faith-based organizations, and charities, in a summit to plan for possible resettlement of displaced Ukrainian citizens within Ohio. This summit occurred on March 17.[81]

Political positions

Abortion

President George W. Bush congratulates Senator Mike DeWine on the passing of the Pediatric Equity Research Act of 2003.

In April 2019, DeWine signed House Bill 493, known as the Ohio “Heartbeat Bill”, into law, prohibiting abortion after a heartbeat is detected in a fetus, with no exceptions for cases of rape and incest, imposing one of the nation’s most extensive abortion restrictions.[82][83] DeWine opposes abortion. In the Senate, he was the lead sponsor of the Unborn Victims of Violence Act.[84] In December 2020, DeWine signed a bill that said “fetal remains from surgical abortions in Ohio must be cremated or buried”; failure to do so would be a misdemeanor of the first degree.[85][86]

Capital punishment

Although Catholic, DeWine has not joined the Pope and Catholic bishops in opposing the death penalty.[87] He has not joined former governor Robert Taft, former attorney general Petro and former Speaker of the House Householder in calling for an end to Ohio executions. Taft cited the ineffectiveness of the death penalty as well as racial and geographic disparities in executions. Yet no executions have been conducted in Ohio since DeWine took office in January 2019, and he has delayed executions due to “ongoing problems involving the willingness of pharmaceutical suppliers to provide drugs to the Ohio Department”.[88] At present, there are no legally permitted execution methods in Ohio, following the abolition of lethal injection in the state.

Gerrymandering

In 2021, DeWine signed a redistricting map that favored Republicans. The map gave Republicans an advantage in 12 out of 15 districts, leaving two safely Democratic districts and one toss-up district. The map passed the Ohio legislature without any support from Democrats. Voting rights advocates called on DeWine to veto the pro-Republican redistricting map. In 2018, voters in Ohio voted in a referendum for anti-gerrymandering reform that encouraged bipartisan support for redistricting maps. The same year, DeWine pledged to honor the voters’ wishes and support a redistricting process that was conducted in a bipartisan way. But in 2021 he approved the changes for 2022 onward.[89]

Gun control

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine leaves the stage after speaking, and the crowd shouts “Do something!” in reaction to the 2019 Dayton shooting.[90]

In 2004, DeWine cosponsored an amendment to renew the Federal Assault Weapons Ban. He has repeatedly received an “F” rating from the National Rifle Association.[91] The National Rifle Association endorsed him for governor.[92] DeWine was one of only two Republican senators to vote against the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, which banned lawsuits against gun manufacturers, distributors and dealers for criminal misuse of their products. In the 2006 election cycle, DeWine was the first senatorial candidate to be endorsed by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence; he displayed the endorsement on his campaign webpage.[93][94] In 2019, DeWine proposed a Red Flag Law for Ohio that would allow courts to take a gun from people seen as a threats to others or themselves.[95]

Highway safety

As U.S. senator, DeWine joined a bipartisan effort to lower the national maximum blood-alcohol limit from 0.10% to 0.08% and to require reporting of vehicle-related deaths on private property like parking lots and driveways.[96] He sponsored legislation on determining when aging tires become unsafe.[97]

LGBT rights

DeWine opposes same-sex marriage[98] and sponsored the Federal Marriage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which would have prevented same-sex marriage.[99] He argued in the Supreme Court in favor of prohibitions on same-sex marriage, saying that same-sex marriage bans infringe on “no fundamental right” and that states should not have to recognize same-sex couples who married in other states. DeWine was acting as attorney general against Jim Obergefell in the case Obergefell v. Hodges. The Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling against DeWine and other defendants, finding same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional.[100][101]

In 2021, DeWine opposed a bill that would have banned transgender athletes from playing on sports teams that do not match their sex at birth, saying, “This issue is best addressed outside of government, through individual sports leagues and athletic associations, including the Ohio High School Athletic Association, who can tailor policies to meet the needs of their member athletes and member institutions.”[102][103]

Marijuana

In 2019 DeWine said: “it would really be a mistake for Ohio, by legislation, to say that marijuana for adults is just OK.” In February 2020, NORML, a group advocating the legalization of marijuana, gave DeWine an “F” rating in relation to his policies.[104]

Net neutrality

As Attorney General of Ohio, DeWine did not join the lawsuits that over 22 states filed in the months following FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai‘s proposal to roll back online consumer protections and net neutrality regulations.[105]

Other

In 2020, DeWine signed a bill that forbids colleges and universities in Ohio blocking controversial speakers.[106] In 2020, DeWine’s compensation was 17th among state governors, at $159,189, compared to a maximum of $225,000 for the governor of New York and a minimum of $70,000 for the governor of Maine. The Ohio Checkbook shows that 92 employees of the Ohio state teachers retirement system, including director William Neville, equal or exceed the governor’s salary.

Personal life

DeWine lives in the Whitelaw Reid House.[107] He and his wife Frances have been married since June 3, 1967, and have had eight children, one of whom died in an automobile accident in 1993.[108][109] Ohio Supreme Court Justice R. Patrick DeWine is Mike DeWine’s son. Former Ohio Republican Party Chairman Kevin DeWine is DeWine’s second cousin. DeWine and his family own Minor League Baseball‘s Asheville Tourists.[110]

Electoral history

1982 Ohio seventh congressional district Republican primary[111]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine32,61569.03%
RepublicanPeter M. Knowlton6,53413.83%
RepublicanJohn F. Evans4,2238.94%
RepublicanLynn Hokenson1,5723.33%
RepublicanJoseph J. Walker1,4763.12%
RepublicanKarl F. Hilt8301.76%
Total votes47,250 100.00%
1982 Ohio seventh congressional district general election[112]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine87,84256.26%−19.86%
DemocraticRoger D. Tackett65,54341.98%+18.10%
LibertarianJohn B. Winer2,7611.77%+1.77%
Total votes156,146 100.00%
1984 Ohio seventh congressional district general election[113]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)147,88578.45%+22.19%
DemocraticDon Scott40,62121.55%−20.43%
Total votes188,506 100.00%
1986 Ohio seventh congressional district general election[114]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)119,238100.00%+21.55%
Total votes119,238 100.00%
1988 Ohio seventh congressional district general election[115]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)142,59773.88%−26.12%
DemocraticJack Schira50,42326.12%+26.12%
Total votes193,020 100.00%
1990 Ohio lieutenant gubernatorial Republican primary[116]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine645,224100.00%
Total votes645,224 100.00%
1990 Ohio lieutenant gubernatorial general election[117]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine1,938,10355.73%+16.35%
DemocraticEugene Branstool1,539,41644.27%−16.35%
Total votes3,477,519 100.00%
1992 Ohio Senate Republican primary[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine583,80570.30%
RepublicanGeorge H. Rhodes246,62529.70%
Total votes830,430 100.00%
1992 Ohio Senate general election[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticJohn Glenn (incumbent)2,444,41950.99%−11.46%
RepublicanMike DeWine2,028,30042.31%+4.76%
Workers WorldMartha Grevatt321,2346.70%+6.70%
Total votes4,793,953 100.00%
1994 Ohio Senate Republican primary[120]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine422,36752.04%
RepublicanBernadine Healy263,56032.47%
RepublicanEugene J. Watts83,10310.24%
RepublicanGeorge H. Rhodes42,6335.25%
Total votes811,663 100.00%
1994 Ohio Senate general election[121]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine1,836,55653.43%+10.41%
DemocraticJoel Hyatt1,348,21339.22%−17.75%
IndependentJoseph I. Slovenec252,0317.33%+7.33%
IndependentDan S. Burkhardt (write-in)2820.01%+0.01%
Socialist WorkersPeter A. Thierjung (write-in)1660.01%+0.01%
Total votes3,437,248 100.00%
2000 Ohio Senate Republican primary[122]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)1,029,86079.51%+27.47%
RepublicanRonald Dickson161,18512.44%
RepublicanFrank Cremeans104,2198.05%
Total votes1,295,264 100.00%
2000 Ohio Senate general election[123]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)2,666,73659.90%+6.47%
DemocraticTed Celeste1,597,12235.87%−3.35%
LibertarianJohn R. McAlister117,4662.64%+2.64%
Natural LawJohn A. Eastman70,7381.59%+1.59%
Socialist WorkersMichael Fitzsimmons (write-in)450.00%−0.01%
IndependentPatrick Flower (write-in)290.00%+0.00%
Total votes4,452,136 100.00%
2006 Ohio Senate Republican primary[124]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)565,58071.71%−7.80%
RepublicanDavid R. Smith114,18614.48%
RepublicanWilliam G. Pierce108,97813.82%
Total votes788,744 100.00%
2006 Ohio Senate general election[125]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticSherrod Brown2,257,36956.16%+20.29%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)1,761,03743.82%−16.08%
IndependentRichard A. Duncan (write-in)8300.02%+0.02%
Total votes4,019,236 100.00%
2010 Ohio Attorney General Republican primary[126]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine687,507100.00%
Total votes687,507 100.00%
2010 Ohio Attorney General general election[127]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine1,821,40847.54%+9.11%
DemocraticRichard Cordray (incumbent)1,772,71746.26%−10.48%
ConstitutionRobert M. Owens130,0653.39%−1.44%
LibertarianMarc Allen Feldman107,5212.81%+2.81%
Total votes3,831,711 100.00%
2014 Ohio Attorney General Republican primary[128]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)544,763100.00%+0.00%
Total votes544,763 100.00%
2014 Ohio Attorney General general election[129]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)1,882,04861.50%+13.96%
DemocraticDavid Pepper1,178,42638.51%−7.75%
Total votes3,060,474 100.00%
2018 Ohio gubernatorial Republican primary[130]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine499,63959.84%
RepublicanMary Taylor335,32840.16%
Total votes834,967 100.00%
2018 Ohio gubernatorial election[131]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine2,231,91750.39%−13.25%
DemocraticRichard Cordray2,067,84746.68%+13.65%
LibertarianTravis Irvine79,9851.81%+1.81%
GreenConstance Gadell-Newton49,4751.12%−2.21%
IndependentRenea Turner (write-in)1850.00%+0.00%
IndependentRichard Duncan (write-in)1320.00%+0.00%
IndependentRebecca Ayres (write-in)410.00%+0.00%
Total votes4,429,582 100.00%
2022 Ohio gubernatorial Republican primary[132]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMike DeWine (incumbent)514,37448.1%
RepublicanJim Renacci299,51528.0%
RepublicanJoe Blystone232,71621.8%
RepublicanRon Hood22,2122.1%
Total votes1,068,817 100.00%

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External links

Ohio Senate
Preceded by

Member of the Ohio Senate
from the 10th district

1981–1982
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio’s 7th congressional district

1983–1991
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Republican nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
1990
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Ohio
(Class 3)

1992
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Ohio
(Class 1)

1994, 2000, 2006
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for Attorney General of Ohio
2010, 2014
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for Governor of Ohio
2018, 2022
Most recent
Political offices
Preceded by

Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
1991–1994
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Governor of Ohio
2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by

U.S. senator (Class 1) from Ohio
1995–2007
Served alongside: John Glenn, George Voinovich
Succeeded by

Legal offices
Preceded by

Attorney General of Ohio
2011–2019
Succeeded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as Vice President

Order of precedence of the United States
Within Ohio
Succeeded by

Mayor of city
in which event is held
Otherwise Nancy Pelosi
as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

as Governor of Tennessee

Order of precedence of the United States
Outside Ohio
Succeeded by

as Governor of Louisiana


X

Mike DeWine – OH

Current Position: Governor since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2022 Governor
Former Positions: Attorney General from 2011 – 2019; US Senator from 1995 – 2007; US Representative from 1983 – 1991

OnAir Post: Mike DeWine – OH

2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

OnAir Post: 2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

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