Mike DeWine

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

Governor of Virginia

Governor of Virginia

The Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. The current holder of the office is Democrat Ralph Northam, who was sworn in on January 13, 2018.

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as "The Honorable", but may occasionally be referred to as "Excellency" if ceremonially appropriate.

Mike DeWineMike DeWine

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

Summary

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

About

Mike DeWine 1

Source: Government page

Mike DeWine’s story is a true Ohio story. Raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Mike DeWine and Fran (Struewing) met in the first grade and married while students at Miami University. They’ve been blessed with eight children and 24 grandchildren. Family is at the core of everything Mike DeWine does, and that’s why he has devoted his life to fighting for Ohio’s families. He knows when families are strong, Ohio communities are stronger, and our future is bright.

Vision for the Future

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He will fight for an Ohio that works for everyone – every person and every family in every corner of our state. From world class cities to some of the best small towns in America, Mike DeWine knows that to build our state into an economic powerhouse, we must have strong schools, a great quality of life, and compassion for those who need our help.

Ohio Values

Mike DeWine’s family started a seed company in Yellow Springs. Working alongside his parents and grandparents, Mike learned early the value of hard work, strong leadership, and fiscal responsibility.

Growing up, he loaded seed bags onto trucks and boxcars, shoveled wheat out of trucks during harvest, worked in wheat fields to help ensure the purity of the seed, and basically did whatever it took to get the job done for their customers. Inseparable to the end, his parents were married for 65 years and died within four days of each other. The values he learned from them still live within him today.

A Lifetime of Service

On November 6, 2018, Mike DeWine was elected to serve as the 70th Governor of the State of Ohio. The Governor has had a long and distinguished career in public service, focusing on protecting Ohio children and families. He was previously the 50th Attorney General of Ohio and has previously been elected to serve as Greene County Prosecutor, Ohio State Senator, U.S. Congressman, Ohio Lt. Governor, U.S. Senator.

Experience

Work Experience

  • U.S. representative
    1983 to 1991
  • Lieutenant governor
    1991 to 1994
  • U.S. senator
    1995 to 2007

Education

  • B.A.
    Miami University
    1969
  • J.D.
    Ohio Northern University
    1972

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Springfield, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian: Catholic
Spouse: Frances Struewing
Children: Pat DeWine, Alice DeWine, Mark DeWine, Rebecca DeWine, Anna DeWine, Jill DeWine, Brian DeWine, John DeWine

Contact

Email:

Offices

Governors Office
Riffe Center, 30th floor, 77th South High Street, Columbus, OH 43215

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia

Politics

Recent Elections

2018 Governor

Richard Michael DeWine (R)2,231,91750.4%
Richard Cordray (D)2,067,84746.7%
Travis Irvine (L)79,9851.8%
Constance Gadell-Newton (G)49,4751.1%
TOTAL4,429,224

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

DEWINE, MIKE has run in 3 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $40,669,526.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Appointments

Find appointments here. 

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Governance

Budget

Governor Mike DeWine’s FY 2020-2021 Executive Budget will be released on March 15, 2019 after the Budget Press Conference.

Governor Mike DeWine’s FY 2020-2021 Executive Budget is now available:

​Children & Families  

Local Communities  

Natural Wonders  

RecoveryOhio  

Workforce & Innovation  

Ohio’s Budget

Health Care

Building Resiliency: A Pediatric Mental Health Summit

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, in conjunction with the Ohio Children’s Hospital Association, hosted a free event called Building Resiliency: A Pediatric Mental Health Summit in September 2019 to help communities support the mental health needs of their children.

Promoting Mental Wellness & Support During COVID-19 Funding Opportunity

In support of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s commitment to the Investment in Ohio’s Future, the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, will offer a $1M funding opportunity for faith-based and community-based organizations. The funds will be directed toward community-based strategies for mental wellness and support during this period of COVID-19.

This opportunity is seeking to support Ohio’s most vulnerable populations. Local communities can apply for resources needed to empower everyday citizens to identify signs of poor mental health and/or addiction, reduce stigma associated with those issues, provide support, and offer resources to people about where to find help.

As we face challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, Ohioans are confronted with multiple stressors, isolation, and distress. This funding opportunity will allow our faith-based and local community-based organizations to engage our communities in conversations around mental health and addiction and walk alongside those in distress as they seek help from a behavioral health professional. Many communities across the state are already facilitating conversations and educational activities to reduce stigma and promote mental wellness. This funding will serve to broaden those efforts at the local level to support Ohioans and build upon those efforts within local communities.

The strategy focuses on building relationships and leveraging digital technologies to build friendly and frequent connections with people in local communities. This approach can best be summed up as using “word of mouth” and finding connectors within the local community to expand the conversations. By empowering influencers with key messages and culturally competent tactics to engage their own communities in conversations to reduce stigma, we are practicing effective and potentially lifesaving efforts within our relationships, families, and communities.

Census 2020

Once every decade, America comes together to count every resident in the United States. The next Census occurs in April 2020.

This website is for Ohioans to have practical resources about the Census to share within their communities. Governor Mike DeWine, Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted and Director of Development Lydia Mihalik are determined to make sure that every individual has a voice in the 2020 Census.

“It’s important that every Ohioan is counted. We want to ensure our state receives the appropriate amount of federal funding to help us support our communities, schools, public safety resources, and to improve our roads.” -Governor Mike DeWine

Earn Extra Income While Helping Your Community

The U.S. Census Bureau is hiring for a variety of temporary jobs throughout the state! The jobs include Census takers, recruiting assistance, office staff and more. Pay rates in Ohio range from $14.00 to $23.50 an hour and feature flexible hours- including evenings and weekends.

If you receive help from any Ohio assistance programs, such as HEAP, PIPP, HWAP, EPP and CSBG, your Census income will not affect your assistance or be used to determine your eligibility. Development excludes the income as a countable income for these programs because of the importance of filling Census positions.

Regional Census positions are key to ensuring an accurate Census count in 2020. Earn extra income and help ensure that everyone in your community is counted by applying for a temporary Census job here or calling 855-562-2020.

Your Census Information Will Be Secure

Census 2020 is the first Census count that will be available to fill out online. Each household will receive a card in the mail with a password to open the form online. You will be able to submit your information with just a few clicks.

The Census website is secure. Only authorized personnel can access the encrypted information.

Foster Care Forums

Every child deserves to grow up in a safe, loving home, whether that is with biological, kinship, foster or adoptive families. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine created the Children Services Transformation Advisory Council to conduct a top-down review of Ohio’s foster care system and develop recommendations on needed reforms so that more Ohio children have a permanent, loving place to call home.

The Children Services Transformation Advisory Council, created through Executive Order 2019-27D, will hold a series of seven regional Foster Care Forums.

All are invited to attend, and those with lived-experience with the foster care system are encouraged to submit testimony.

Recovery Ohio

Moments after taking the oath of office, Governor DeWine created the RecoveryOhio initiative to ensure that we act aggressively to address this crisis and invest in the health and well-being of Ohio’s citizens.

Faith-Based And Community Initiatives

The mission of the Governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives is to promote solutions, including those from faith-based partners, to community needs and support the development of collaborative efforts to improve the well-being

innovate Ohio

InnovateOhio’s mission is to look at every state service with an eye on the customer’s experience.

Common Sense Initiative

CSI exists to create a regulatory climate in Ohio that maximizes business economic potential while ensuring the health and safety of Ohio’s citizens.

Led by Lt. Governor Jon Husted, Ohio’s Common Sense Initiative (CSI) reviews business-impacting rules, helps businesses navigate regulatory obstacles, and leads initiatives to improve Ohio’s regulatory climate. CSI was formed to propel job and economic growth in Ohio.

Since its launch, CSI has reviewed nearly 15,000 state agency regulations, and has identified 60 percent of those regulations as potential obstacles to Ohio businesses. All of those identified regulations were either amended or rescinded.

Twitter

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Featured Video Play Icon2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

Summary

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

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Governor of Virginia

The Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. The current holder of the office is Democrat Ralph Northam, who was sworn in on January 13, 2018.

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as "The Honorable", but may occasionally be referred to as "Excellency" if ceremonially appropriate.

Summary

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as “The Honorable”, but may occasionally be referred to as “Excellency” if ceremonially appropriate.

Duties

From Wikipedia

The governor is the head of government in Virginia. At the beginning of every regular session, they must report the state of the Commonwealth to the Virginia General Assembly (both the House of Delegates and the Senate). They must convene the legislature when two-thirds of each house calls for a special session. The governor must ensure that the laws of the Commonwealth are faithfully executed by either signing, or allowing it to come into law, or vetoing, not allowing it to become law. They are responsible for the safety of the state, as they serve as commander-in-chief of the Virginia Militia.

Powers

From Wikipedia

  • The governor has the legislative power to submit recommendations and to call special sessions when he finds them necessary.
  • The governor has veto powers. All bills must be sent to the governor before becoming law. The governor may sign the bill, let it sit unsigned for seven days, after which it becomes law, or veto the legislation. After a veto, the bill returns to its house of origin and may be overridden by two-thirds of the vote in each house.
  • The governor also has the power to use a line-item veto. He may send legislation back to the legislature with recommendations and amendments. The legislature must either approve the changes by a majority in each house or override the veto with a two-thirds majority in each house.
  • The governor is commander-in-chief of Virginia’s militia forces.
  • The governor may also communicate with other states and foreign powers.
  • The governor has the power to fill vacancies in positions unless the position is appointed by the legislature.
  • The governor may commute fines or sentences and issue pardons. The governor may also restore voting rights and overturn other political penalties on individuals.

History

From Wikipedia

The position of Governor of Virginia dates back to the 1607 first permanent English settlement in America, at Jamestown on the north shore of the James River upstream from Hampton Roads harbor at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The Virginia Company of London set up a government run by a council. The president of the council basically served as a governor. The council was based in London and controlled the colony from afar. Nominally, Thomas Smith was the first president of the council, but he never left England. Edward Maria Wingfield was the first president of the council in residence in the new province, making him the first to exercise the actual authority of governing Virginia. The Virginia Company soon abandoned governance by council two years after the landing on May 23, 1609, and replacing it with a governor, the famous and dynamic leader, John Smith (1580-1631).

In 1624, the English Monarchy of King James I (1566-1625, reigned 1603-1625), in the last year of his reign, of the royal House of Stuart took control from the Virginia Company and its stockholders and made Virginia a crown colony. Governors continued to be appointed by the monarch for many years. Most often, the appointed governor would reside in England while a deputy or lieutenant governor actually exercised authority. Royal rule was interrupted during the English Civil War (1642-46 / 1648-49), after which governors were appointed by the Protectorate under Richard Cromwell (successor to Oliver Cromwell) in the interim Commonwealth of England until the English Restoration of the monarchy with King Charles II in 1660.

Commonwealth

Virginia became an independent sovereign state and Commonwealth during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), with Patrick Henry(1736-1799, served 1776-79 / 1786-89) as its first governor (and also later sixth). From the Revolution until 1851, the governor was elected by the General Assembly of Virginia (commonwealth/state legislature). After 1851, in a democratic trend spreading across the Union, the state turned to popular elections for office holders.

During the American Civil War (1861-1865), Francis Harrison Pierpont was the governor of the Union-controlled parts of the state, later of which emerged the new state in the northwest of West Virginia. Pierpont also served as one of the provisional governors during the post-war Reconstruction era. These governors were appointed by the Federal government of the President and U.S. Congress, both controlled by Radical Republicans for a decade. In 1874, Virginia regained its right to self-governance and elected James L. Kemper (1823-1895), a Democrat and temporary Conservative Party member and former Confederate general as governor. After the Radical Republican appointees of the post-war Reconstruction era, Virginia would not actually elect another regular Republican as governor until A. Linwood Holton Jr. in 1969. However, in 1881 William E. Cameron was elected governor under the banner of the Readjuster Party, a coalition of Republicans and populist Democrats. Douglas Wilder became the first elected and only the second African American Governor of any U.S. state. He served as governor from 1990 to 1994.

Since 1851, Virginia’s gubernatorial elections have been held in “off-years”—years in which there are no national (presidential, senatorial, or House) elections; Virginia’s gubernatorial elections are held one year after U.S. presidential elections (2001, 2005, 2009, etc.) (Most states hold gubernatorial elections either on presidential-election years or midterm-election years, when there are congressional elections.) In every Virginia gubernatorial election starting with 1977, the governor elected had been from the opposite party as the president elected by the nation in the previous year, even when Virginia had voted for the president in office, as with Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. The only exception being in 2013 with the election of Democrat Terry McAuliffe, following the re-election of President Obama in 2012.

Tim Kaine was inaugurated on January 14, 2006. Due to renovations on the Capitol in Richmond, his inauguration was held in Williamsburg, making him the first governor to be inaugurated in Williamsburg since Thomas Jefferson in 1779. The current governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam, who was inaugurated on January 13, 2018.

List of Governors

#PictureGovernorTook officeLeft office
1Patrick henry.JPGPatrick HenryJuly 5, 1776June 1, 1779
2T Jefferson by Charles Willson Peale 1791 2.jpgThomas JeffersonJune 1, 1779June 3, 1781
3No image.svgWilliam FlemingJune 3, 1781June 12, 1781
4Thomas Nelson (1700s).jpgThomas Nelson, Jr.June 12, 1781November 22, 1781
No image.svgDavid JamesonNovember 22, 1781December 1, 1781
5Benharrv.JPGBenjamin Harrison VDecember 1, 1781December 1, 1784
6Patrick henry.JPGPatrick HenryDecember 1, 1784December 1, 1786
7EdmundRandolph.jpegEdmund RandolphDecember 1, 1786December 1, 1788
8No image.svgBeverley RandolphDecember 1, 1788December 1, 1791
9HenryLee.jpegHenry Lee IIIDecember 1, 1791December 1, 1794
10Robert Brooke Virginia Governor.jpgRobert BrookeDecember 1, 1794December 1, 1796
11No image.svgJames WoodDecember 1, 1796December 1, 1799
No image.svgHardin BurnleyDecember 7, 1799December 11, 1799
No image.svgJohn Pendleton, Jr.December 11, 1799December 19, 1799
12James Monroe White House portrait 1819.jpgJames MonroeDecember 19, 1799December 1, 1802
13John Page Rosewell Gloucester County Virginia.jpgJohn PageDecember 1, 1802December 7, 1805
14William Cabell.gifWilliam H. CabellDecember 7, 1805December 1, 1808
15John Tyler Sr.jpgJohn Tyler, Sr.December 1, 1808January 15, 1811
George William Smith.jpgGeorge William SmithJanuary 15, 1811January 19, 1811
16James Monroe White House portrait 1819.jpgJames MonroeJanuary 19, 1811April 3, 1811
17George William Smith.jpgGeorge William SmithApril 3, 1811December 26, 1811
N/APeyton Randolph Virginia Governor.jpgPeyton RandolphDecember 27, 1811January 3, 1812
18BarbourT.jpgJames BarbourJanuary 3, 1812December 1, 1814
19Wilson Cary Nicholas 2.jpgWilson Cary NicholasDecember 1, 1814December 1, 1816
20James Patton Preston.jpgJames Patton PrestonDecember 1, 1816December 1, 1819
21Thomas Mann Randolph.jpgThomas Mann Randolph, Jr.December 1, 1819December 1, 1822
22James Pleasants bioguide.jpgJames PleasantsDecember 1, 1822December 10, 1825
23Tyler Daguerreotype crop (restoration).jpgJohn TylerDecember 10, 1825March 4, 1827
24William Branch Giles.jpgWilliam Branch GilesMarch 4, 1827March 4, 1830
25John Floyd crop.jpgJohn FloydMarch 4, 1830March 31, 1834
26LWTzw.jpgLittleton Waller TazewellMarch 31, 1834April 30, 1836
Wyndhamrobertsonportrait.jpgWyndham RobertsonApril 30, 1836March 31, 1837
27David Campbell.jpgDavid CampbellMarch 31, 1837March 31, 1840
28Thomas Gilmer newer.jpegThomas Walker GilmerMarch 31, 1840March 20, 1841
John Mercer Patton.jpgJohn M. PattonMarch 20, 1841March 31, 1841
John Rutherford Virginia Governor.jpgJohn RutherfoordMarch 31, 1841March 31, 1842
John Munford Gregory.jpgJohn Munford GregoryMarch 31, 1842January 1, 1843
29James McDowell.jpgJames McDowellJanuary 1, 1843January 1, 1846
30Hon. Smith - NARA - 528722.jpgWilliam SmithJanuary 1, 1846January 1, 1849
31John Buchanan Floyd.jpgJohn B. FloydJanuary 1, 1849January 16, 1852
32Joseph Johnson.pngJoseph JohnsonJanuary 16, 1852January 1, 1856
33HAWise.jpgHenry A. WiseJanuary 1, 1856January 1, 1860
34JohnLetcher.jpgJohn LetcherJanuary 1, 1860January 1, 1864
35Extra Billy Smith-Virginia.jpgWilliam SmithJanuary 1, 1864May 9, 1865
Francis Pierpont portrait.gifFrancis Harrison PierpontMay 9, 1865April 4, 1868
Henry Wells.jpgHenry H. WellsApril 4, 1868September 21, 1869
36Gilbert Carlton Walker.gifGilbert Carlton WalkerSeptember 21, 1869January 1, 1874
37James L Kemper.jpgJames L. KemperJanuary 1, 1874January 1, 1878
38Frederick Holliday.jpgFrederick W. M. HollidayJanuary 1, 1878January 1, 1882
39WE Cameron.jpgWilliam E. CameronJanuary 1, 1882January 1, 1886
40Fitzhugh Lee Governor.jpgFitzhugh LeeJanuary 1, 1886January 1, 1890
41Philip McKinney.jpgPhilip W. McKinneyJanuary 1, 1890January 1, 1894
42Charles O'Ferrall.jpgCharles Triplett O’FerrallJanuary 1, 1894January 1, 1898
43James Hoge Tyler.jpgJames Hoge TylerJanuary 1, 1898January 1, 1902
44Andrew J. Montague.jpgAndrew Jackson MontagueJanuary 1, 1902February 1, 1906
45CASwanson.jpgClaude A. SwansonFebruary 1, 1906February 10, 1910
46William Hodges Mann, ca. 1914.jpgWilliam Hodges MannFebruary 10, 1910February 1, 1914
47H.C. Stuart.jpgHenry Carter StuartFebruary 1, 1914February 1, 1918
48Governorwestmdavis.jpgWestmoreland DavisFebruary 1, 1918February 1, 1922
49GovTrinkle.jpgElbert Lee TrinkleFebruary 1, 1922February 1, 1926
50Harry F. Byrd.jpgHarry F. ByrdFebruary 1, 1926January 15, 1930
51JGPollard.jpgJohn Garland PollardJanuary 15, 1930January 17, 1934
52GeorgeCPeery.jpgGeorge C. PeeryJanuary 17, 1934January 15, 1938
53JamesHPrice.jpgJames H. PriceJanuary 15, 1938January 21, 1942
54Colgate W. Darden (Virginia Governor).jpgColgate DardenJanuary 21, 1942January 16, 1946
55William M. Tuck.jpgWilliam M. TuckJanuary 16, 1946January 18, 1950
56John S. Battle.jpgJohn S. BattleJanuary 18, 1950January 20, 1954
57Thomas Bahnson Stanley.jpgThomas B. StanleyJanuary 20, 1954January 11, 1958
58James Lindsay Almond - circa 1945 to 1949 - US House of Representatives.jpgJ. Lindsay AlmondJanuary 11, 1958January 13, 1962
59Albertis S. Harrison, Jr. 1962.jpgAlbertis HarrisonJanuary 13, 1962January 15, 1966
60Mills Godwin 1966.jpgMills GodwinJanuary 15, 1966January 17, 1970
61Linwood Holton 1970.jpgLinwood HoltonJanuary 17, 1970January 12, 1974
62Mills Godwin 1974.jpgMills GodwinJanuary 12, 1974January 14, 1978
63John Dalton 1976.jpgJohn DaltonJanuary 14, 1978January 16, 1982
64Charles Robb 1980.jpgChuck RobbJanuary 16, 1982January 18, 1986
65Gerald Baliles 1986.jpgGerald BalilesJanuary 18, 1986January 13, 1990
66D.Wilder S.Senate poster (cropped).jpgDouglas WilderJanuary 13, 1990January 15, 1994
67George Allen.jpgGeorge AllenJanuary 15, 1994January 17, 1998
68Jim Gilmore 2004 NSTAC crop.jpgJim GilmoreJanuary 17, 1998January 12, 2002
69Mark Warner.jpgMark WarnerJanuary 12, 2002January 14, 2006
70Gov. Tim Kaine (cropped).jpgTim KaineJanuary 14, 2006January 16, 2010
71Bob McDonnell by Gage Skidmore.jpgBob McDonnellJanuary 16, 2010January 11, 2014
72Virginia Governor Democrats Terry McAuliffe 095 Cropped.jpgTerry McAuliffeJanuary 11, 2014January 13, 2018
73Governor Ralph Northam Gives Inaugural Address (39348612584) (cropped).jpgRalph NorthamJanuary 13, 2018Incumbent

 

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