Mike DeWine

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

Virginia General Assembly

Virginia General Assembly

The Virginia General Assembly is the legislative body of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World, established on July 30, 1619.

The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia’s clerk is known as the “Clerk of the Senate” (instead of as the “Secretary of the Senate”, the title used by the U.S. Senate).

Here is an excellent concise summary  by Wyatt Gordon of how the Virginia General Assembly works.

2020 VA General Assembly Leaders

2020 VA General Assembly Leaders

Ralph Northam, Governor Commonwealth of Virginia
Justin Fairfax, Lt. Governor
Mark Herring, Attorney General

Dick Saslaw, Senate Majority Leader
Louise Lucas, Senate Pro Tempore
Tom Norment, Senate Minority Leader

Eileen Fillen-Corn, Speaker of the House
Charniele Herring, House Majority Leader
Todd Gilbert, House Minority Leader

More leader information inside this post …

Virginia State Government

Virginia State Government

The government of Virginia combines the three branches of authority in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The current Governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam.

The State Capitol building in Richmond was designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the cornerstone was laid by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785. Virginia currently functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia. It is the Commonwealth's seventh constitution. Under the Constitution, the government is composed of three branches, the legislative, the executive and the judicial.

Websitevirginia.gov/government

Contact page
Address: 1000 Bank Street
RichmondVA23219

Mike DeWineMike DeWine

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

Summary

Current Position: Governor
Affiliation: Republican

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He knows that every parent wants their kids to have an opportunity for a solid education, a healthy life that is free of drugs, and a good paying job later in life. Republican leadership has righted the ship in Ohio, but Mike knows that we have a chance to propel our state even farther ahead.

Mike knows that for our state to succeed in the future, we have to take efforts to create and retain jobs in Ohio to the next level. By curbing excessive taxation and burdensome regulations, his focus will be on creating a more inviting business environment and bringing and keeping jobs in Ohio.

About

Mike DeWine 1

Source: Government page

Mike DeWine’s story is a true Ohio story. Raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Mike DeWine and Fran (Struewing) met in the first grade and married while students at Miami University. They’ve been blessed with eight children and 24 grandchildren. Family is at the core of everything Mike DeWine does, and that’s why he has devoted his life to fighting for Ohio’s families. He knows when families are strong, Ohio communities are stronger, and our future is bright.

Vision for the Future

Mike DeWine loves Ohio and cares passionately about our state’s future. He will fight for an Ohio that works for everyone – every person and every family in every corner of our state. From world class cities to some of the best small towns in America, Mike DeWine knows that to build our state into an economic powerhouse, we must have strong schools, a great quality of life, and compassion for those who need our help.

Ohio Values

Mike DeWine’s family started a seed company in Yellow Springs. Working alongside his parents and grandparents, Mike learned early the value of hard work, strong leadership, and fiscal responsibility.

Growing up, he loaded seed bags onto trucks and boxcars, shoveled wheat out of trucks during harvest, worked in wheat fields to help ensure the purity of the seed, and basically did whatever it took to get the job done for their customers. Inseparable to the end, his parents were married for 65 years and died within four days of each other. The values he learned from them still live within him today.

A Lifetime of Service

On November 6, 2018, Mike DeWine was elected to serve as the 70th Governor of the State of Ohio. The Governor has had a long and distinguished career in public service, focusing on protecting Ohio children and families. He was previously the 50th Attorney General of Ohio and has previously been elected to serve as Greene County Prosecutor, Ohio State Senator, U.S. Congressman, Ohio Lt. Governor, U.S. Senator.

Experience

Work Experience

  • U.S. representative
    1983 to 1991
  • Lieutenant governor
    1991 to 1994
  • U.S. senator
    1995 to 2007

Education

  • B.A.
    Miami University
    1969
  • J.D.
    Ohio Northern University
    1972

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Springfield, OH
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian: Catholic
Spouse: Frances Struewing
Children: Pat DeWine, Alice DeWine, Mark DeWine, Rebecca DeWine, Anna DeWine, Jill DeWine, Brian DeWine, John DeWine

Contact

Email:

Offices

Governors Office
Riffe Center, 30th floor, 77th South High Street, Columbus, OH 43215

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia

Politics

Recent Elections

2018 Governor

Richard Michael DeWine (R)2,231,91750.4%
Richard Cordray (D)2,067,84746.7%
Travis Irvine (L)79,9851.8%
Constance Gadell-Newton (G)49,4751.1%
TOTAL4,429,224

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

DEWINE, MIKE has run in 3 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $40,669,526.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Appointments

Find appointments here. 

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Governance

Budget

Governor Mike DeWine’s FY 2020-2021 Executive Budget will be released on March 15, 2019 after the Budget Press Conference.

Governor Mike DeWine’s FY 2020-2021 Executive Budget is now available:

​Children & Families  

Local Communities  

Natural Wonders  

RecoveryOhio  

Workforce & Innovation  

Ohio’s Budget

Health Care

Building Resiliency: A Pediatric Mental Health Summit

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, in conjunction with the Ohio Children’s Hospital Association, hosted a free event called Building Resiliency: A Pediatric Mental Health Summit in September 2019 to help communities support the mental health needs of their children.

Promoting Mental Wellness & Support During COVID-19 Funding Opportunity

In support of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s commitment to the Investment in Ohio’s Future, the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, in partnership with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, will offer a $1M funding opportunity for faith-based and community-based organizations. The funds will be directed toward community-based strategies for mental wellness and support during this period of COVID-19.

This opportunity is seeking to support Ohio’s most vulnerable populations. Local communities can apply for resources needed to empower everyday citizens to identify signs of poor mental health and/or addiction, reduce stigma associated with those issues, provide support, and offer resources to people about where to find help.

As we face challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, Ohioans are confronted with multiple stressors, isolation, and distress. This funding opportunity will allow our faith-based and local community-based organizations to engage our communities in conversations around mental health and addiction and walk alongside those in distress as they seek help from a behavioral health professional. Many communities across the state are already facilitating conversations and educational activities to reduce stigma and promote mental wellness. This funding will serve to broaden those efforts at the local level to support Ohioans and build upon those efforts within local communities.

The strategy focuses on building relationships and leveraging digital technologies to build friendly and frequent connections with people in local communities. This approach can best be summed up as using “word of mouth” and finding connectors within the local community to expand the conversations. By empowering influencers with key messages and culturally competent tactics to engage their own communities in conversations to reduce stigma, we are practicing effective and potentially lifesaving efforts within our relationships, families, and communities.

Census 2020

Once every decade, America comes together to count every resident in the United States. The next Census occurs in April 2020.

This website is for Ohioans to have practical resources about the Census to share within their communities. Governor Mike DeWine, Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted and Director of Development Lydia Mihalik are determined to make sure that every individual has a voice in the 2020 Census.

“It’s important that every Ohioan is counted. We want to ensure our state receives the appropriate amount of federal funding to help us support our communities, schools, public safety resources, and to improve our roads.” -Governor Mike DeWine

Earn Extra Income While Helping Your Community

The U.S. Census Bureau is hiring for a variety of temporary jobs throughout the state! The jobs include Census takers, recruiting assistance, office staff and more. Pay rates in Ohio range from $14.00 to $23.50 an hour and feature flexible hours- including evenings and weekends.

If you receive help from any Ohio assistance programs, such as HEAP, PIPP, HWAP, EPP and CSBG, your Census income will not affect your assistance or be used to determine your eligibility. Development excludes the income as a countable income for these programs because of the importance of filling Census positions.

Regional Census positions are key to ensuring an accurate Census count in 2020. Earn extra income and help ensure that everyone in your community is counted by applying for a temporary Census job here or calling 855-562-2020.

Your Census Information Will Be Secure

Census 2020 is the first Census count that will be available to fill out online. Each household will receive a card in the mail with a password to open the form online. You will be able to submit your information with just a few clicks.

The Census website is secure. Only authorized personnel can access the encrypted information.

Foster Care Forums

Every child deserves to grow up in a safe, loving home, whether that is with biological, kinship, foster or adoptive families. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine created the Children Services Transformation Advisory Council to conduct a top-down review of Ohio’s foster care system and develop recommendations on needed reforms so that more Ohio children have a permanent, loving place to call home.

The Children Services Transformation Advisory Council, created through Executive Order 2019-27D, will hold a series of seven regional Foster Care Forums.

All are invited to attend, and those with lived-experience with the foster care system are encouraged to submit testimony.

Recovery Ohio

Moments after taking the oath of office, Governor DeWine created the RecoveryOhio initiative to ensure that we act aggressively to address this crisis and invest in the health and well-being of Ohio’s citizens.

Faith-Based And Community Initiatives

The mission of the Governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives is to promote solutions, including those from faith-based partners, to community needs and support the development of collaborative efforts to improve the well-being

innovate Ohio

InnovateOhio’s mission is to look at every state service with an eye on the customer’s experience.

Common Sense Initiative

CSI exists to create a regulatory climate in Ohio that maximizes business economic potential while ensuring the health and safety of Ohio’s citizens.

Led by Lt. Governor Jon Husted, Ohio’s Common Sense Initiative (CSI) reviews business-impacting rules, helps businesses navigate regulatory obstacles, and leads initiatives to improve Ohio’s regulatory climate. CSI was formed to propel job and economic growth in Ohio.

Since its launch, CSI has reviewed nearly 15,000 state agency regulations, and has identified 60 percent of those regulations as potential obstacles to Ohio businesses. All of those identified regulations were either amended or rescinded.

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Featured Video Play Icon2020 State of the Commonwealth Address

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

Summary

Who: Governor Ralph Northam

What: Annual address to Virginia senators, delegates, and supreme court justices

When: Jan. 8, 2020 – 7 to 8 pm (EST)

Where: Richmond State Capitol

Content from the original Virginia House of Delegates recording has not been edited in any way.

To view Governor Northam’s 2019 State of the Commonwealth Address, go this post. This post also has a transcript of the Governor’s address and articles about the address. Go to Ralph Northam’s post to learn more about the Governor.

Coming soon – transcript and articles on 2020 address

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Virginia General Assembly

The Virginia General Assembly is the legislative body of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World, established on July 30, 1619.

The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia’s clerk is known as the “Clerk of the Senate” (instead of as the “Secretary of the Senate”, the title used by the U.S. Senate).

Here is an excellent concise summary  by Wyatt Gordon of how the Virginia General Assembly works.

Summary

The Virginia General Assembly is the legislative body of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World, established on July 30, 1619.

The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia’s clerk is known as the “Clerk of the Senate” (instead of as the “Secretary of the Senate”, the title used by the U.S. Senate).

Here is an excellent concise summary  by Wyatt Gordon of how the Virginia General Assembly works.

Capitol

The General Assembly meets in Virginia’s capital of Richmond. When sitting in Richmond, the General Assembly holds sessions in the Virginia State Capitol, designed by Thomas Jefferson in 1788 and expanded in 1904. During the American Civil War, the building was used as the capitol of the Confederate States of America, housing the Congress of the Confederate States. The building was renovated between 2005 and 2006. Senators and Delegates have their offices in the General Assembly Building across the street directly north of the Capitol. The Governor of Virginia lives across the street directly east of the Capitol in the Virginia Executive Mansion.

History

The Virginia General Assembly is described as “the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World”. Its existence dates to its establishment at Jamestown on July 30, 1619 by instructions from the Virginia Company of London to the new Governor Sir George Yeardley. It was initially a unicameral body composed of the Company-appointed Governor and Council of State, plus 22 burgesses elected by the settlements and Jamestown.  The Assembly became bicameral in 1642 upon the formation of the House of Burgesses. At various times it may have been referred to as the Grand Assembly of Virginia. The General Assembly met in Jamestown from 1619 until 1699, when it first moved to the College of William & Mary near Williamsburg, Virginia and later met in the colonial Capitol building. It became the General Assembly in 1776 with the ratification of the Virginia Constitution. The government was moved to Richmond in 1780 during the administration of Governor Thomas Jefferson.

Salary and qualifications

The annual salary for senators is $18,000. The annual salary for delegates is $17,640.

Under the Constitution of Virginia, Senators and Delegates must be 21 years of age at the time of the election, residents of the district they represent, and qualified to vote for members of the General Assembly. Under the Constitution, “a senator or delegate who moves his residence from the district for which he is elected shall thereby vacate his office”.

The state constitution specifies that the General Assembly shall meet annually, and its regular session is a maximum of 60 days long in even-numbered years and 30 days long in odd-numbered years, unless extended by a two-thirds vote of both houses . The governor of Virginia may convene a special session of the General Assembly “when, in his opinion, the interest of the Commonwealth may require” and must convene a special session “upon the application of two-thirds of the members elected to each house”.

Redistricting reform

Article II, section 6 on apportionment states, “Members of the … Senate and of the House of Delegates of the General Assembly shall be elected from electoral districts established by the General Assembly. Every electoral district shall be composed of contiguous and compact territory and shall be so constituted as to give, as nearly as is practicable, representation in proportion to the population of the district.”  The Redistricting Coalition of Virginia proposes either an independent commission or a bipartisan commission that is not polarized. Member organizations include the League of Women Voters of Virginia, AARP of Virginia, OneVirginia2021, the Virginia Chamber of Commerce and the Virginia Organizing Project. Governor Bob McDonnell’s Independent Bipartisan Advisory Commission on Redistricting for the Commonwealth of Virginia made its report on April 1, 2011. It made two recommendations for each state legislative house that showed maps of districts more compact and contiguous than those adopted by the General Assembly.

In 2011, the Virginia College and University Redistricting Competition was organized by Professors Michael McDonald of George Mason University and Quentin Kidd of Christopher Newport University. About 150 students on sixteen teams from thirteen schools submitted plans for legislative and U.S. Congressional Districts. They created districts more compact than the General Assembly’s efforts. The “Division 1” maps conformed with the Governor’s Executive Order, and did not address electoral competition or representational fairness. In addition to the criteria of contiguity, equipopulation, the federal Voting Rights Act and communities of interest in the existing city and county boundaries, “Division 2” maps in the competition did incorporate considerations of electoral competition and representational fairness. Judges for the cash award prizes were Thomas Mann of the Brookings Institution and Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute.

In January 2015, Republican State Senator Jill Holtzman Vogel of Winchester and Democratic State Senator Louise Lucas of Portsmouth sponsored a Senate Joint Resolution to establish additional criteria for the Virginia Redistricting Commission of four identified members of political parties, and three other independent public officials. The criteria began with respecting existing political boundaries, such as cities and towns, counties and magisterial districts, election districts and voting precincts. Districts are to be established on the basis of population, in conformance with federal and state laws and court cases, including those addressing racial fairness. The territory is to be contiguous and compact, without oddly shaped boundaries. The commission is prohibited from using political data or election results to favor either political party or incumbent. It passed with a two-thirds majority of 27 to 12 in the Senate, and was then referred to committee in the House of Delegates.

In 2015, at Vesilind v. Virginia State Board of Elections in a Virginia state court, plaintiffs sought to overturn the General Assembly’s redistricting in five House of Delegate and six state Senate districts as violations of both the Virginia and U.S. Constitutions because they failed to represent populations in “continuous and compact territory”.

2019 State Senators

Monty Mason
Mamie Locke
Thomas Norment
Ryan McDougle
Lionell Spruill
Lynwood Lewis
Frank Wagner
Bill DeSteph
Jenn McClellan
Glen Sturtevant
Amanda Chase
Siobhan Dunnavant
Richard Black
John Cosgrove
Frank Ruff
Roz Dance
Bryce Reeves
Louise Lucas
David Suetterlein
Bill Stanley
John Edwards
Mark Peake
Stephen Newman
Emmett Hanger
Creigh Deeds
Mark Obenshain
Jill Vogel
Richard Stuart
Jeremy McPike
Adam Ebbin
Barbara Favola
Janet Howell
Jennifer Boysko
Chap Petersen
Dick Saslaw
Scott Surovell
Dave Marsden
Benton Chafin
George Barker
Bill Carrico

2019 Delegates

Terry Kilgore
Jennifer Carroll Foy
Will Morefieldns
todd Pillion
Israel O’Quinn
Jeffrey Campbell
Nick Rush
Joseph McNamara
Charles Poindexter
Wendy Gooditis
Sam Rasoul
Chris Hurst
Danica Roem
Danny Marshall
Todd Gilbert
Les Adams
Christopher Head
Mike Webert
Terry Austin
Dickie Bell
Kelly Convirs-Fowler
Kathy Byron
Scott Garrett
Open
Steve Landes
Tony Wilt
Roxann Robinson
Bob Thomas
Chris Collins
Nick Freitas
Liz Guzman
David Reid
David LaRock
Kathleen Murphy
Mark Keam
Ken Plum
David Bulova
Kaye Kory
Vivian Watts
Tim Hugo
Eileen Filler-Corn
Kathy Tran
Mark Sickles
Paul Krizek
Mark Levine
Charniele Herring
Patrick Hope
Rip Sullivan
Alfonso Lopez
Lee Carter
Hala Ayala
Luke Torian
Marcus Simon
Robert Orrock
Buddy Fowler
John McGuire
David Toscano
Robert Bell
Matthew Fariss
James Edmunds
Thomas Wright
Riley Ingram
Lashrecse Aird
Emily Brewer
Lee Ware
Kirkland Cox
Karrie Delaney
Dawn Adams
Betsy Carr
Delores McQuinn
Jeffrey Bourne
Schuyler VanValkenburg
Debra Rodman
Lamont Bagby
Roslyn Tyler
Chris Jones
Cliff Hayes
Jay Leftwich
Stephen Heretick
Matthew James
Barry Knight
Jason Miyares
Christopher Stolle
Glenn Davis
Cheryl Turpin
Jennifer Boysko
John Bell
Mark Cole
Jay Jones
Joseph Lindsey
Gordon Helsel
Jeion Ward
Michael Mullin
David Yancey
Marcia Price
Brenda Pogge
Christopher Peace
Keith Hodges
Margaret Ransone
Robert Bloxom
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2020 VA General Assembly Leaders

Ralph Northam, Governor Commonwealth of Virginia
Justin Fairfax, Lt. Governor
Mark Herring, Attorney General

Dick Saslaw, Senate Majority Leader
Louise Lucas, Senate Pro Tempore
Tom Norment, Senate Minority Leader

Eileen Fillen-Corn, Speaker of the House
Charniele Herring, House Majority Leader
Todd Gilbert, House Minority Leader

More leader information inside this post …

Summary

Ralph Northam, Governor Commonwealth of Virginia
Justin Fairfax, Lt. Governor
Mark Herring, Attorney General

Dick Saslaw, Senate Majority Leader
Louise Lucas, Senate Pro Tempore
Tom Norment, Senate Minority Leader

Eileen Fillen-Corn, Speaker of the House
Charniele Herring, House Majority Leader
Todd Gilbert, House Minority Leader

More leader information inside this post …

Governor Ralph Northam

Current Position: Governor since 2018
Former Positions: Lt. Governor from 2014 – 2018; State Senator for VA Senate District 6 from 2008 – 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Mission Statement:
“Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service. He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.”

About Ralph Northam

Source: Government page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Ralph Northam 2

Before he was inaugurated as the 73rd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam served as an Army doctor, pediatric neurologist, business owner, state Senator and Lieutenant Governor.

A native of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Governor Northam was educated at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), where he graduated with distinction.

After graduation, Governor Northam was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. He served eight years of active duty and rose to the rank of major.

He attended Eastern Virginia Medical School and then traveled to San Antonio for a pediatric residency, where he met his wife Pamela, a pediatric occupational therapist at the same hospital.  Governor Northam did his residencies at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and served as chief neurological resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital. As an Army doctor, he served in Germany, treating soldiers wounded in Operation Desert Storm.

When Governor Northam and Pamela returned home, they chose to build their life in Hampton Roads. He began practicing pediatric neurology at Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Norfolk. He established Children’s Specialty Group, his current medical practice, to provide expert pediatric care for patients. Governor Northam also served as assistant professor of neurology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, where he taught medicine and ethics.

Governor Northam volunteered as medical director for the Edmarc Hospice for Children in Portsmouth, where he spent 18 years caring for terminally ill children.

Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service.  He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.

Governor Northam is the first native of the Eastern Shore to serve as Governor since Governor Henry A. Wise took office 1856. He is also the first VMI Keydet to serve as Governor since Governor Westmoreland Davis took office in 1918.

Governor Northam and First Lady Pamela Northam have two adult children: Wes, a neurosurgical resident in Chapel Hill, and Aubrey, a web developer in Richmond.

Justin Fairfax

Current Position: Lt. Governor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

About Justin Fairfax

Source: Government page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Justin Fairfax 2Justin was elected Lieutenant Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia on November 7, 2017. Justin is only the second African-American in history, and the first in nearly 30 years since the tenure of Governor L. Douglas Wilder, to be elected to statewide office in Virginia. His Inauguration took place on January 13, 2018.

Justin, 39, has been recognized as one of the top young attorneys in the nation and a rising star in American politics. He is a prominent and highly successful lawyer, political figure, philanthropist, and a proud husband, father, and community leader. In 2013, at the age of 34, Justin was awarded the National Bar Association’s “Nation’s Best Advocates Award,” which recognizes 40 top attorneys nationwide under the age of 40. He most recently served as a top commercial and white-collar criminal litigator in the Northern Virginia office of the prestigious law firm, Venable, LLP, which he departed in January 2018 to focus on his duties as Lieutenant Governor during his first General Assembly session.

He previously served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia in the Major Crimes and Narcotics Unit of the Alexandria Division. During his tenure as a federal prosecutor, he was appointed to serve as the Deputy Coordinator of the Northern Virginia Human Trafficking Task Force. Prior to his service as a federal prosecutor, he worked as a litigator at WilmerHale, LLP in Washington, D.C., following his stint as a federal law clerk to United States District Court Judge Gerald Bruce Lee in the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division.

Justin received a scholarship to attend Columbia Law School where he was selected to be a member of the Columbia Law Review and earned his Juris Doctorate in 2005. He also received a scholarship to attend Duke University where he graduated in 2000 with a degree in Public Policy Studies and was selected as the class graduation speaker for the Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy.

Mark Herring

Current Position: Attorney General since 2014
Former Positions: State Senator for VA Senate District 33 from 2007 – 2013
Affiliation: Democrat

About Mark Herring

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Mark Herring 2

Mark Herring was raised by a single mother in Loudoun County, Virginia. She instilled in him that when you see a problem in your community, you have an obligation to try and fix it. He worked construction and other jobs in order to help pay for college. And he’s never forgotten where he came from, which is why he works every single day to make our families and communities safer.

As Attorney General, Mark has assembled an elite team of prosecutors to crack down on heroin dealers, violent gang members, gun runners, human traffickers, and those who attempt to exploit our children online.

He is helping survivors of sexual assault pursue justice by eliminating a three-decade-old backlog of more than 2,000 untested rape kits to find and prosecute criminals.

He has made communities safer by cracking down on illegal guns and promoting commonsense gun safety laws, like universal background checks, that keep guns out of the hands of dangerous criminals. And he has worked to improve relations between police departments and the communities they serve with innovative training and recruiting initiatives.

Since the day he was sworn in, Attorney General Herring has worked nonstop to defend the rights of Virginia taxpayers, seniors, veterans, and military families. He has won more than $100 million in debt relief and restitution for veterans and military families, and his best-in-the-nation Medicaid Fraud unit has saved taxpayers more than $60 million.

Just 12 days into his term, General Herring became the first attorney general to successfully argue that his state’s ban on marriage for same-sex couples should be struck down, winning at the district court and appeals court before the United States Supreme Court let the decision stand, bringing marriage equality to the Commonwealth within 10 months of his taking office.

He has won huge victories in courts for clean air and water including the Chesapeake Bay, for affordable health care, and for the right of all Virginians to live and worship free from hate and discrimination.

Prior to being elected Attorney General, Mark served as a state Senator representing Loudoun and Fairfax counties. Mark worked on issues facing one of America’s fastest-growing counties and some of the world’s most innovative businesses. Mark also served on Loudoun County’s Board of Supervisors, and was a small business owner, running a private practice in his hometown of Leesburg where he has practiced law for more than 20 years.

Mark received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Virginia, and graduated with honors from the University of Richmond School of Law.

Mark and his wife, Laura, have been married for 27 years. They have two children, daughter Peyton, 24, and son Tim, 21.

Dick Saslaw

Current Position: State Senator for VA Senate District 35 since 1980
Affiliation: Democrat

About Dick Saslaw

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Dick Saslawproudly serves Virginia’s 35th Senate District and as Democratic Leader in the Senate of Virginia. His distinguished public service has brought about real, positive results for families in Northern Virginia. Throughout his tenure in the General Assembly, Dick has fought for investments in public K-12 and higher education, fought to improve the social safety net, maintain Virginia’s business-friendly climate, and find solutions for Northern Virginia’s transportation problems. In Richmond, he has distinguished himself for his ability to work across the aisle to get results.

Senator Saslaw worked tirelessly and helped lead the charge to expand Medicaid for hundreds of thousands of Virginians without access to healthcare. No longer will Virginia leave billions of federal dollars unclaimed. Instead, these monies will help benefit more than 400,000 of our Commonwealth neighbors in need of affordable healthcare and provide hope for the otherwise desperate. Senator Saslaw was honored by the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association as a 2018 “Healthcare Hero” for his multi-year dedication to expanding Medicaid in the Commonwealth.

Democratic Leader Saslaw plays a key role in working with Governor Ralph Northam to grow the New Virginia Economy. Competing in a 21st-century global economy, Virginia must focus on building a talented workforce pipeline that can attract and retain businesses and investment. Senator Saslaw has helped advocate for innovative new programs like the Workforce Credentials Grant, which provides funding for workers looking for education and training in high-demand industries like cybersecurity. Virginia boasts one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation and ranks 4th on CNBC’s list of “America’s Top States for Business.”

In the General Assembly, Senator Saslaw serves on the Senate Committees on Finance, Commerce & Labor, Courts of Justice, Education & Health, and Rules. Dick has been honored by groups far and wide for his efforts to make Virginia a great place to live, work, and raise a family. These awards include:

Virginia Education Association “Legislator of the Year”
The Hispanic Alliance “Leader of the Year”
League of Conservation Voters “Legislative Hero”
Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce “NOVAForward Legacy Award”
Virginia Chamber of Commerce “Leadership in Energy Award” & “Free Enterprise Award” (Transportation Category)
Virginia Transit Association “Distinguished Legislative Leadership Award”
Virginia Professional Fire Fighters “Legislator of the Year”
Virginia FREE “Virginia’s Most Effective Senator”
VA Autism Project & Autism Speaks “Autism Champion”

Dick grew up in Washington, D.C. He served in the U.S. Army for two years prior to earning a B.S. in economics from the University of Maryland. In college, he was a member of the track team, and is still an active runner. He is a successful local businessman in the gasoline and auto service industry.

Dick and his wife, Eleanor, are proud grandparents and have lived in Northern Virginia since 1968. Eleanor currently serves on the State Board of Virginia’s Community Colleges is a previous chair of the board. She also previously served as president of the State Board of Education. Dick and Eleanor’s adult daughter, Jennifer, is a graduate of the 35th District’s own Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, the University of Virginia, and the Stanford School of Law. She is also a former Peace Corps volunteer.

Louise Lucas

Current Position: State Senator for VA Senate District 18 since 1992
Affiliation: Democrat

About Louise Lucas

Source: Wikipedia
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Louise LucasThe Honorable L. Louise Lucas is a Portsmouth native and product of the Portsmouth Public School System. She is President/CEO of Lucas Lodge, Lucas Transportation, Portsmouth Day Support Program and Southside Direct Care Provider organizations operating in The Lucas Professional Center located in Portsmouth.

Senator Lucas began her federal career in 1967 as an Apprentice Shipfitter at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) and became the first Woman Shipfitter in July 1971. Senator Lucas began her public sector career path as Interim Executive Director of the Southeastern Tidewater Opportunity Project (STOP) in 1985 and was appointed Executive Director in 1986 where she served until 1992.

Graduating with honors, Senator Lucas received her Bachelor of Science degree (Cum Laude) in Vocational-Industrial Education from Norfolk State University in 1971 and her Master of Arts Degree (Magna Cum Laude) in Urban Affairs with a concentration in Human Resources Planning and Administration also from Norfolk State University in 1982.

Senator Lucas served in the position of Congressional Liaison for Sponsored Program at Old Dominion University from 1992 – 1994. She also served as Assistant Professor, Department of Academic Affairs and Special Assistant to the Vice President for University Advancement at Norfolk State University from 1994 – 1998.

Senator L. Louise Lucas was elected to the Virginia General Assembly in November 1991 and continues to serve the citizens of the 18th Senatorial District.

Senator Lucas is the mother of two daughters, Lisa L. Lucas-Burke and Theresa Lynn Lucas-Lamb who partner with her in various business entities and one son, the late Jeffery Lee Lucas, Sr. She has five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Tom Norment

Current Position: State Senator for VA Senate District 3 since 1992
Affiliation: Republican

About Tom Norment

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Thomas NormentTommy Norment first came to Virginia’s 3rd Senatorial District as a child when his father worked at Cheatham Annex.

A graduate of James Blair High School in Williamsburg, Tommy attended college at Virginia Military Institute before returning to Williamsburg to attend the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary. In 1987, Tommy was elected to the James City County Board of Supervisors. He served as Chairman of the Board in 1991 before being elected to the Senate of Virginia.

Tommy maintains an active role in the community. He is a member of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Board of Trustees and the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation’s Board of Directors. He is on the Hampton Roads Board of Directors of TowneBank and he chairs the Williamsburg Board of TowneBank. Tommy is also a member of the Williamsburg Area Chamber of Commerce and the James City County Ruritan Club.

Professionally, Tommy is an attorney with Kaufman and Canoles, P.C., and a professor at the College of William and Mary.

Eileen Filler-Corn

Current Position:  State Delegate for VA House District 41
Affiliation: Democrat

About Eileen Filler-Corn

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Eileen Filler-CornEileen Filler-Corn has served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 41st District, since 2010. The 41st District, located in Fairfax County, includes Burke and parts of Fairfax, Fairfax Station and West Springfield. Eileen has over two decades of experience in both the public and private sectors, working across party lines to make a difference in the lives of all Virginians.

In the House of Delegates, Eileen is a member of the Transportation Committee, Finance Committee and the Commerce & Labor Committee. She currently serves on the Joint Commission on Transportation Accountability, Health Insurance Reform Commission, Joint Commission on Technology and Science, Virginia Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation and the Transportation Public-Private Partnership Steering Committee. She also chairs the Advisory Council on Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) & Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). Additionally, she is the chair and a founding member of the bipartisan General Assembly Arts Caucus. She also serves as Vice Chair for Outreach of the House Democratic Caucus, having previously served as the House Democratic Whip.
Outside of the Virginia General Assembly, appointments include: Chair of the Board for Jobs for Virginia Graduates and Virginia State Director for both Women in Government and the National Foundation for Women Legislators. In addition, she was selected to join the bipartisan Governing Institute’s Women in Government Class of 2017. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of the following organizations: American Jewish Committee (AJC), Clean Air Partners, the Center for Public Policy Innovation (CPPI) and Jewish Federation for Group Homes (JFGH).

In addition to serving in the House, Eileen Filler-Corn is the Director of Government Relations at Albers & Company. Eileen brings over 25 years of extensive governmental, legal and political experience to the firm, designing and implementing strategies unique to every client in order to achieve their specific goals and objectives.

Previously, Eileen served in the Administrations of Governor Mark Warner and Governor Tim Kaine, advising on state and federal relations. For over 25 years, Eileen and her husband Bob have lived in Fairfax County, Virginia, along with their children, Jeremy and Alana.

Charniele Herring

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 46 since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat

About Charniele Herring

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Charniele HerringCharniele has lived in Northern Virginia area for over 30 years, most of them in the West End of Alexandria.  Charniele has a rich history of community involvement as a volunteer, a member of Rotary, and a past Chair of the West End Business Association. She has served on the Alexandria Commission for Women, including Chairing the organization.  She was also appointed by Governor Tim Kaine to the state’s Council on the Status of Women. She presently serves on the Board of the Parent Teacher Leadership Institute of Alexandria and as a Trustee of Hopkins House—advocating for strong pre-k education.

Born into military family, Charniele moved often as child before landing permanently in Northern Virginia.  When she was a teenager, Charniele’s mother lost her job and despite their best efforts they ended up homeless.  For a time, Charniele and her mother stayed in a homeless shelter at nights while Charniele attended West Springfield High School during the day and her mother searched for work.  The experience of being homeless shaped Charniele’s character and taught her the values of hard work, resilience and looking out for those people society often overlooks.

Charniele got the chance to attend college as part of the STEP Program that allowed students from disadvantaged backgrounds the opportunity to prove they were capable of college level work.  She commuted to George Mason for four years and graduated with a degree in Economics, and while she was in school she gave back as a volunteer crisis intervention counselor and trainer at Alexandria Mental Health Services and worked with nonprofit advocates on issues surrounding homelessness prevention.  Charniele’s first job out of college was as a VISTA volunteer providing low-income housing for at-risk families before attending law school at Catholic University’s Columbus School of Law.  After law school, Charniele worked at the oldest African-American owned firm in Greater Washington before opening up her own firm here in Northern Virginia. She currently works as General Counsel to Admin & Logistics, Inc, a government contracting firm.

Todd Gilbert

Current Position:  State Delegate for VA House District 15 since 2006
Former Positions: Prosecutor from 1997 – 2006
Affiliation: Republican

About Todd Gilbert

Source: Campaign page
For more information: see Virginia onAir post

Todd GilbertDelegate Todd Gilbert represents the 15th district in the Virginia House of Delegates; it includes all of Page and Shenandoah Counties and portions of Warren and Rockingham Counties. He was first elected to the House in 2005. In 2018, Delegate Gilbert was elected Majority Leader of the House of Delegates. Delegate Gilbert is a member of the Courts of Justice Committee, the Rules Committee, and serves as the Vice-Chairman of the House General Laws Committee. He also serves on the Virginia State Crime Commission, which helps to study and direct polices on public safety throughout Virginia and he is the Chairman of the House Criminal Law Subcommittee.

Delegate Gilbert has received numerous awards and distinctions during his tenure in the House of Delegates including the Virginia YMCA’s “Service to Youth Award” for his annual work with their Model General Assembly in Richmond. In 2013, he was named the Family Foundation’s “Legislator of the Year” for his work in promoting family values and religious freedom in Virginia. The Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys also awarded Gilbert their inaugural “Champion of Justice Award” for his extensive work in public safety policy. Both the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police and the Virginia State Police Association have honored Gilbert with their “Legislator of the Year” Award. The American Conservative Union also named him a “Defender of Liberty” for his 100% conservative voting record during the legislative session. Finally, in 2017, Gilbert was named a “Legislator of the Year” by the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for his years of work as a pro-business leader.

Prior to his election to the House of Delegates, Delegate Gilbert began his career as a full-time prosecutor. His first job was with the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for the City of Lynchburg, where he was a member of the Violent Crime Prosecution Team. In 1999, he was fortunate to be able to return home and work in the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for Shenandoah County for six years where he was lead prosecutor in a number of major cases. After his election to the House, Gilbert worked for several years as a prosecutor in both the Warren County and Frederick County Commonwealth’s Attorneys Offices. He has taught the art of trial advocacy to fellow prosecutors at the Commonwealth’s Attorneys’ annual trial advocacy school. Taking advantage of his experience in Virginia’s criminal justice system, Gilbert’s primary legislative focus is public safety.

Gilbert is a 1989 graduate of Central High School of Woodstock, where he served as student body president and played three varsity sports. He attended the University of Virginia, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in Government in 1993. While at UVA, he was a legislative intern in the Capitol Hill office of then U.S. Representative George Allen. Upon graduation, he attended the Southern Methodist University School of Law, where he earned his law degree in 1996 and also led the student body as president of the Student Bar Association. While at SMU Law, Gilbert won the school’s annual mock trial competition and participated on the school’s competitive mock trial team.

When not in Richmond for the legislative session, Delegate Gilbert now works in a private law practice. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Woodstock.

Todd is married to the lovely and talented Jennifer Wishon Gilbert, and in 2017 they were blessed with a son.  Jennifer is a broadcast journalist who is currently the White House Correspondent for CBN News. Jennifer covers the President and national politics in Washington, D.C. The Gilberts live on a small farm outside of Mount Jackson, Virginia.

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Virginia State Government

The government of Virginia combines the three branches of authority in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The current Governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam.

The State Capitol building in Richmond was designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the cornerstone was laid by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785. Virginia currently functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia. It is the Commonwealth's seventh constitution. Under the Constitution, the government is composed of three branches, the legislative, the executive and the judicial.

Websitevirginia.gov/government

Contact page
Address: 1000 Bank Street
RichmondVA23219

Summary

The State Capitol building in Richmond was designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the cornerstone was laid by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785. Virginia currently functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia. It is the Commonwealth’s seventh constitution. Under the Constitution, the government is composed of three branches, the legislative, the executive and the judicial.

Websitevirginia.gov/government

Contact page
Address: 1000 Bank Street
RichmondVA23219

Starting point Wikipedia Entry

Executive branch

The statewide elected officials are governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

All three officers are separately elected to four-year terms in years following Presidential elections (1997, 2001, 2005, etc.) and take office in January of the following year. Virginia is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (the others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New Jersey). The last gubernatorial election was in 2017, and the next will occur in 2021.

The governor serves as chief executive officer of the Commonwealth and as commander-in-chief of its militia. The Constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself in office (though a governor is allowed to serve multiple non-consecutive terms). The Lieutenant Governor, who is not elected on the same ticket as the governor, serves as president of the Senate of Virginia and is first in the line of succession to the governor. The Lieutenant Governor is allowed to run for reelection. The Attorney General is chief legal advisor to the governor and the General Assembly, chief lawyer of the Commonwealth and the head of the Department of Law. The attorney general is second in the line of succession to the governor. Whenever there is a vacancy in all three executive offices of governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, then the Speaker of the House of the Virginia House of Delegates becomes governor.

Cabinet

The Virginia Governor’s Cabinet is a body of the most senior appointed officers of the executive branch, responsible for advising the Governor. It is composed of the following offices,nominated by the Governor and then presented to the Virginia General Assembly for confirmation:

The Virginia Department of Highways Building in Richmond, headquarters of the Department of Transportation

Many executive branch agencies have the authority to promulgate regulations. Proposals to create or amend state regulations are often subject to review by the executive branch.

Legislative branch

The Senate Chamber of the Virginia State Capitol

The legislative branch or state legislature is the General Assembly. The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The General Assembly holds sessions in the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond.

The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia’s clerk is known as the “Clerk of the Senate” (instead of as the “Secretary of the Senate,” the title used in the United States Senate). The General Assembly also selects the Commonwealth’s Auditor of Public Accounts. The statutory law enacted by the General Assembly is codified in the Code of Virginia.

Judiciary

The Supreme Court building in Richmond

The judiciary of Virginia is defined under the Constitution and law of Virginia and is composed of the Supreme Court of Virginia and subordinate courts, including the Court of Appeals, the Circuit Courts, and the General District Courts. Its administration is headed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, the Judicial Council, the Committee on District Courts, the Judicial Conferences, and various other officers.

Local government

The political subdivisions of Virginia are the areas into which the state is divided for political and administrative purposes. In Virginia, the political subdivisions have only the legal powers specifically granted to them by the General Assembly and set forth under the Code of Virginia.

Some are local governments; others are not. However, all local governments (cities, counties, and incorporated towns) are political subdivisions of the state. All public school divisions are political subdivisions of the state, although each has local and some controlling relationships of varying types with the counties, cities and/or towns they serve. Some political subdivisions are defined geographically; others by function. Many authorities (such as water, or transportation districts) are created by specific legislation as political subdivisions of the state.

Structure and authority

Every location in Virginia is within a county or an independent city, but never both. The 95 counties and the 39 independent cities all have their own governments. Cities are governed by an elected Mayor or city council which choose a city manager or county administrator to serve as a professional, non-political chief administrator under the council-manager form of government, while counties are governed by a county board of supervisors.Many specifics are set forth in “charters”, specific legislation adopted by the General Assembly. Other forms of local government are also provided by statute.

Virginia limits the authority of cities and counties to enact ordinances by what is known as the Dillon’s Rule. Counties and cities may only pass laws expressly allowed by the state legislature or which are necessary to effect powers granted by the state. Dillon’s Rule will invalidate local ordinances that exceed authority granted by the state.

There are exceptions to the general structure for counties and cities, notably the City of Richmond, which has a popularly elected mayor who serves as chief executive separate from the city council, an innovative arrangement which has caused some local turmoil under the first mayor so elected, former Governor Lawrence D. Wilder. As of November 2007, the courts were in the process of clarifying the duties and powers, and limitations thereupon in response to multiple lawsuits filed by other locally elected officials.

Officers

Local government consists of city and county officers, as well as people who are known as constitutional officers. The positions of these constitutional officers are provided for by the Virginia Constitution. Article 7, Section 4 of the Virginia constitution provides, “There shall be elected by the qualified voters of each county and city a treasurer, a sheriff, an attorney for the Commonwealth, a clerk, who shall be clerk of the court in the office of which deeds are recorded, and a commissioner of revenue.” The local constitutional offices are not appointed by the city or county. The Judges of the Circuit Court, the General District Court and the Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court are appointed by the State legislature. The constitutional officers have salaries set by the state through its compensation board, although the locality may supplement the salaries. This structure allows those officers a measure of independence within the local government setting.

The Commonwealth’s Attorney is the elected prosecuting attorney for the locality. The Sheriff is the law enforcement officer for localities without a police department. Where a police department has been established, the Sheriff remains authorized to enforce the criminal laws. The Sheriff, however, is responsible for the operation of the local jail, courthouse security and service of civil papers and may also execute criminal warrants.

History

Founded in 1619, the Virginia General Assembly is still in existence as the oldest legislature in the New World. In colonial Virginia, the lower house of the legislature was called the House of Burgesses. Together with the Governor’s Council, the House of Burgesses made up the “General Assembly”. The Governor’s Council was composed of 12 men appointed by the British Monarch to advise the Governor. The Council also served as the “General Court” of the colony, a colonial equivalent of a Supreme Court. Members of the House of Burgesses were chosen by all those who could vote in the colony. Each county chose two people or burgesses to represent it, while the College of William and Mary and the cities of Norfolk, Williamsburg and Jamestown each chose one burgess. The Burgesses met to make laws for the colony and set the direction for its future growth; the Council would then review the laws and either approve or disapprove them. The approval of the Burgesses, the Council, and the governor was needed to pass a law. The idea of electing burgesses was important and new. It gave Virginians a chance to control their own government for the first time. At first, the burgesses were elected by all free men in the colony. Women, indentured servants, and Native Americans could not vote. Later the rules for voting changed, making it necessary for men to own at least fifty acres (200,000 m²) of land in order to vote.

Like many other states, by the 1850s Virginia featured a state legislature, several executive officers, and an independent judiciary. By the time of the Constitution of 1901, which lasted longer than any other state constitution, the General Assembly continued as the legislature, the Supreme Court of Appeals acted as the judiciary, and the eight executive officers were elected: the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of the Commonwealth, State Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Commissioner of Agriculture and Immigration. The Constitution of 1901 was amended many times, notably in the 1930s and 1950s, before it was abandoned in favor of more modern government, with fewer elected officials, reformed local governments and a more streamlined judiciary.

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